Online Learning Efficacy Research Database

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Showing 1 - 10 of 194 citations
Comparing delivery approaches to teaching abnormal psychology: Investigating student perceptions and learning outcomes.
Goette, W. F., Delello, J. A., Schmitt, A. L., Sullivan, J. R., Rangel, A.
This study compares the academic performance and perceptions of 114 undergraduate students enrolled in an abnormal psychology course. Specifically, this study focuses on whether face-to-face (F2F) or blended … [more]
This study compares the academic performance and perceptions of 114 undergraduate students enrolled in an abnormal psychology course. Specifically, this study focuses on whether face-to-face (F2F) or blended modalities are associated with student learning outcomes. In this study, data analysis was based upon the examination of end-of-course grades, final exams, and an end-of-course survey. The data revealed that the same course presented in a F2F and a hybrid modality was associated with nearly identical learning outcomes in terms of student evaluations and final exam scores. However, students did note differences in course delivery in terms of time, assessment, and overall structure. 
Full-texts of the citations in the database are protected by copyright. If you would like to read the full articles, please check your academic library. For more information, read the FAQ.
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2017, Psychology Learning & Teaching, 16(3), 336-352.
  |   Psychology  |   Traditional, Fully online  |   114 Undergraduate
Science self-efficacy of preservice teachers in face-to-face versus blended environments.
Knaggs, C. M., Sondergeld, T. A., Henry, D.
Using a quasi-experimental mixed methods concurrent design, this study measured the science self-efficacy of pre-service elementary teachers before and after a survey of science content course. Further, this … [more]
Using a quasi-experimental mixed methods concurrent design, this study measured the science self-efficacy of pre-service elementary teachers before and after a survey of science content course. Further, this course was delivered in two different formats: face-to-face and hybrid (approximately 50% online), and compared pre-and post-science self-efficacy of students in the two different course formats. Our quantitative results showed increases in personal efficacy, but not outcome expectancy for both formats, and no significant differences between the increases for either format. Our qualitative data showed that participants attributed their increased levels of personal efficacy to the hands-on components of the course, as well as perceived teacher attitudes toward science, both of which would be challenging to replicate in a purely online format, as opposed to the hybrid format included in this study. 
Full-texts of the citations in the database are protected by copyright. If you would like to read the full articles, please check your academic library. For more information, read the FAQ.
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2017, School Science and Mathematics, 117(1-2), 27-33.
  |   Education  |   Traditional, Blended/hybrid  |   42 Undergraduate
Effect of blended e-learning on pre-service teachers' achievement in mathematics: A case for sustainable teacher education.
Nwoke, B. I. , Emenyonu, A. O., Ihekaire, U. R.
The study investigated the impact of blended e-learning on pre-service teachers’ achievement in Mathematics. The sample consists of 280 level I pre-service teachers in school of sciences of … [more]
The study investigated the impact of blended e-learning on pre-service teachers’ achievement in Mathematics. The sample consists of 280 level I pre-service teachers in school of sciences of Alvan Ikoku Federal College of Education Owerri. The quasi-experimental research design adopting the pre-test, post-test non-equivalent type was used in carrying out the study. A researcher made objective test questions titled “Mathematics Achievement Test (MAT)” was used for data collection. It had reliability coefficient of 0.83 determined using Kuder-Richardson (KR20) formula. The control group was taught mathematics using the traditional method while the experimental group was taught using blended e-learning method (traditional and e-learning). The data generated were analysed using mean and standard deviation to answer the research questions while ANCOVA was used to test hypotheses at 0.05 level of significance. The result of the study revealed that blended e-learning is an effective method of teaching mathematics among pre-service teachers. Based on the result it was recommended that blended e-learning method should be applied in teaching Mathematics education of pre-service teachers. 
Full-texts of the citations in the database are protected by copyright. If you would like to read the full articles, please check your academic library. For more information, read the FAQ.
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2017, European Journal of Education Studies , 3(10), 572-582.
  |   Teacher Education  |   Traditional, Blended/hybrid  |   280 Undergraduate
Virtually the same: A comparison of STEM students content knowledge, course performance, and motivation to learn in virtual and face-to-face introductory biology laboratories.
Reece, A. J., Bulter, M. B.
Biology I is a required course for many science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) majors and is often their first college-level laboratory experience. The replacement of the traditional … [more]
Biology I is a required course for many science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) majors and is often their first college-level laboratory experience. The replacement of the traditional face-to-face laboratory experience with virtual laboratories could influence students’ content knowledge, motivation to learn biology, and overall course performance. Three hundred undergraduate STEM students in face-to-face or virtual laboratories in a Biology I course completed a laboratory content test and the Biology Motivation Questionnaire II at the beginning and end of the semester. Final course grades were also obtained. Analyses revealed no significant differences between STEM students in the face-to-face and virtual laboratories in learning gains on the content test and final course grades. Two thirds of the STEM students experienced a decline in motivation to learn biology over the semester, but no significant differences were found between the laboratory groups. Thus, virtual laboratories may offer an affordable alternative to resource intensive face-to-face laboratories in large-enrollment Biology I courses. 
Full-texts of the citations in the database are protected by copyright. If you would like to read the full articles, please check your academic library. For more information, read the FAQ.
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2017, Journal of College Science Teaching, 46(3), 83–89.
  |   Biology  |   Traditional, Fully online  |   300 Undergraduate
The impact of a flipped classroom design on learning performance in higher education: Looking for the best "blend" of lectures and guiding questions with feedback.
Thai, N. T. T. , De Wever, B., Valcke, M.
The present study examines the differential impact of studying in a Flipped Classroom (FC) setting, as compared to a Blended Learning (BL), a Traditional Learning (TL), and an … [more]
The present study examines the differential impact of studying in a Flipped Classroom (FC) setting, as compared to a Blended Learning (BL), a Traditional Learning (TL), and an E-Learning (EL) setting on learning performance, self-efficacy beliefs, intrinsic motivation, and perceived flexibility. Participants were second year undergraduate students (N = 90), enrolled in the “Invertebrates” course in Can Tho University (Vietnam). Participants were randomly assigned to one of the four experimental conditions (TL n = 22, BL n = 22, FC n = 23, EL n = 23). Two instructional elements - (1) lectures and (2) guiding questions - were presented through two different modes (online and face-to-face). In the blended conditions (BL and FC) the mode of these elements were altered. The results show that learning performance was superior in the FC setting as compared to other learning settings TL (Cohens' d = 1.58), EL (Cohens' d = 1.01) and BL (Cohens' d = 0.71). Students in the BL setting had a higher learning performance as compared to the EL setting. In addition, we observed that studying in a FC setting had a positive effect on self-efficacy beliefs and intrinsic motivation, but not on perceived flexibility. These findings suggest that the FC setting could be a promising way of enhancing students’ learning performance. 
Full-texts of the citations in the database are protected by copyright. If you would like to read the full articles, please check your academic library. For more information, read the FAQ.
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2017, Computers in Education, 107, 113-126.
  |   Science  |   Traditional, Blended/hybrid, Fully online  |   90 Undergraduate
Academic performance in blended-learning and face-to-face university teaching.
Alducin-Ochoa, J. M., Vázquez-Martínez, A. I.
The benefits promoted by the use of the blended-learning model in higher education have been well studied from a general point of view, but no conclusive results have … [more]
The benefits promoted by the use of the blended-learning model in higher education have been well studied from a general point of view, but no conclusive results have been achieved so far. However, within the field of engineering, these researches are quite scarce and become even rarer in the case of researches trying to demonstrate whether the benefits of blended learning could be compared to those achieved by classroom education. Learning platforms allow us to incorporate rich learning resources, interactive tools that foster collaborative learning, student to student, student to professor and student-professor-student interactions. Learning platforms also give us the opportunity of incorporating tasks that allow students to check the progress of their own learning processes. This paper presents the results of a research carried out at the School of Technical Architecture of the University of Seville with students enrolled in the Materials Science course. The aim of this investigation was to compare students’ results when trained by means of traditional teaching and blended learning. In order to achieve our goal we followed a quasi-experimental, descriptive and correlational design applied to two non-equivalent groups. The results indicated that in the blended-learning model, the students had more academic success as compared to traditional teaching. 
Full-texts of the citations in the database are protected by copyright. If you would like to read the full articles, please check your academic library. For more information, read the FAQ.
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2016, Asian Social Science, 12(3), 207.
  |   Engineering  |   Traditional, Blended/hybrid  |   327 Undergraduate
A Comparison of Online and Face-to-Face Approaches to Teaching Introduction to American Government.
Bolsen, T., Evans, M., Fleming, A. M.
This article reports results from a large study comparing four different approaches to teaching Introduction to American Government: (1) traditional, a paper textbook with 100% face-to-face lecture-style teaching; ( … [more]
This article reports results from a large study comparing four different approaches to teaching Introduction to American Government: (1) traditional, a paper textbook with 100% face-to-face lecture-style teaching; (2) breakout, a paper textbook with 50% face-to-face lecture-style teaching and 50% face-to-face small-group breakout discussion sections moderated by graduate students; (3) blended, an interactive online textbook with face-to-face full-class meetings taught with a blend of lecture, discussions, and in-class activities; and (4) online only, an interactive online textbook with (almost) no face-to-face class meetings. We find that the mode of course delivery is significantly related to student academic engagement and performance as well as civic educational outcomes. Although drop rates were higher in the online only condition, students who successfully completed the online course were significantly more likely to express interest in discussing and participating in politics. Furthermore, students in the online only and blended conditions demonstrated significantly higher levels of objective political knowledge relative to students taking the course in a more traditional format. Finally, students enrolled in sections that assigned the interactive online textbook rated their textbook as significantly more beneficial to their learning experiences than did students who used the traditional paper textbook. 
Full-texts of the citations in the database are protected by copyright. If you would like to read the full articles, please check your academic library. For more information, read the FAQ.
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2016, Journal of Political Science Education, 12(3), 302–317.
  |   Political Science  |   Traditional, Web-facilitated, Fully online  |   1,524 Undergraduate
Longitudinal student research competency: Comparing online and traditional face-to-face learning platforms.
Brown, J. C. , Park, H.-S.
This exploratory research compares longitudinal research self-efficacy and retention between a completely asynchronous Master of Social Work (MSW) online cohort and its traditional face-to-face counterpart. This study used … [more]
This exploratory research compares longitudinal research self-efficacy and retention between a completely asynchronous Master of Social Work (MSW) online cohort and its traditional face-to-face counterpart. This study used a non-equivalent comparison groups design with two groups: online instruction only (n=16) and traditional face-to-face instruction (n=32), with pretest (Time 1), posttest (Time 2) and follow-up (Time 3) standardized measures of practice evaluation knowledge (PEKS) and research self-efficacy (RSES) in a beginning research methods course. Results indicate that students’ knowledge and research self-efficacy improved between pretest and posttest and remained significantly improved at follow-up one year later, with no significant difference between online learners and traditional face-to-face students. Students gain and maintain confidence in research methods and evaluation regardless of the learning platform utilized. 
Full-texts of the citations in the database are protected by copyright. If you would like to read the full articles, please check your academic library. For more information, read the FAQ.
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2016, Advances in Social Work, 17(1), 44–58.
  |   Social Work  |   Traditional, Fully online  |   48 Graduate
A comparison of learning outcomes in skills-based courses: Online versus face-to-face formats.
Callister, R. R., Love, M. S.
In comparing the learning outcomes of online versus face-to-face courses, skills-based forms of instruction have received little attention. This study asks the question “Can skills-based courses taught online … [more]
In comparing the learning outcomes of online versus face-to-face courses, skills-based forms of instruction have received little attention. This study asks the question “Can skills-based courses taught online achieve the same outcomes as face-to-face courses in which the instructor and students interacting in real time may have higher levels of interaction, thus potentially facilitating higher levels of skill improvement?” If so, what are the critical success factors that influence these outcomes? These questions are examined by comparing four classes in negotiations (two face-to-face and two online) taught by the same professor. The courses were designed to be as similar as possible except for their delivery method. Results indicate that face-to-face learners earned higher negotiation outcomes than online learners even when using the same technology. Suggestions are offered for improving outcomes. 
Full-texts of the citations in the database are protected by copyright. If you would like to read the full articles, please check your academic library. For more information, read the FAQ.
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2016, Decision Sciences Journal of Innovative Education, 14(2), 243–256.
  |   Business  |   Traditional, Fully online  |   134 Graduate
Comparing the effectiveness of blended, semi-flipped, and flipped formats in an engineering numerical methods course.
Clark, R. M., Kaw, A., Besterfield-Sacre, M.
Blended, flipped, and semi-flipped instructional approaches were used in various sections of a numerical methods course for undergraduate mechanical engineers. During the spring of 2014, a blended approach … [more]
Blended, flipped, and semi-flipped instructional approaches were used in various sections of a numerical methods course for undergraduate mechanical engineers. During the spring of 2014, a blended approach was used; in the summer of 2014, a combination of blended and flipped instruction was used to deliver a semi-flipped course; and in the fall of 2014, a fully-flipped approach was taken. Blended instruction aims to integrate technology-driven instruction with face-to-face learning and is often used to enhance the traditional lecture. With "flipped" instruction, students practice skills during class after viewing or/and reading lecture content beforehand. To directly assess these instructional methods, we compared multiple-choice and free response results from identical final exams. We did this for all students as well as demographic segments of interest to our research, including underrepresented minorities and transfer students. We uncovered several differences having medium to large effect sizes, suggesting that some degree of flipped instruction may have been more beneficial than blended learning for both lower and higher-order skills development. The students rated the classroom environment using Fraser's College and University Classroom Environment Inventory (CUCEI). The three classroom environments were statistically similar with small effect sizes. However, there was a trend in lower ratings for the flipped and semi-flipped classrooms versus the blended classroom across the various environmental dimensions. This may indicate that blended instruction had the most desirable classroom environment. Based on an evaluation survey, only 38% of respondents preferred flipped instruction to usual methods, although 54% preferred active learning to lecture. In an open-ended question, the most frequently-stated benefits of flipped instruction involved enhanced learning or learning processes, and engagement and professional behaviors. These results aligned with our focus group results. This study is believed to be one of the first to compare these three modalities in a STEM course. 
Full-texts of the citations in the database are protected by copyright. If you would like to read the full articles, please check your academic library. For more information, read the FAQ.
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2016, Advances in Engineering Education, 5(3), n3.
  |   Engineering  |   Web-facilitated, Blended/hybrid  |   132 Undergraduate
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This Ecampus Research Unit project is a searchable resource of academic studies of education efficacy across modalities. Filter by discipline or journal to find research in your subject area of interest. View overview or read the FAQ.

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