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Computer Science

An instructor stands behind a sci-fi projection table

What makes Oregon State online programs stand out?

Can a high-quality degree truly be delivered online? How can you support students at a distance? How do I learn science online? At OSU Ecampus, we hear questions like these often, and we’re proud to have the answers – as well as decades of experience in delivering nationally-ranked education to students around the world. Watch a video and read more to see how it’s done.

Mark Moore, Oregon State University Ecampus computer science postbaccalaureate graduate, standing in a server room.

Using computer science to improve education

Change is a word we often prefer to keep at arm’s length. It’s great in the fall, watching leaves change color with a pumpkin-spiced-something in hand, but beyond that it can be intimidating to say the least. Mark Moore, on the other hand, embraced change when he chose to step away from his career as a classroom teacher to pursue a future that blends education and computer science by learning online with OSU Ecampus.

Photo of Anousha Farshid, an Oregon State University Ecampus student who studies computer science online

Oregon State Everywhere: ‘Combining computer science and music is my passion’

I thought about several other majors, but the only thing I enjoyed doing beyond playing music was problem-solving, coding and building an idea from scratch. I had too many ideas that could be realized using technology. That is the reason I chose to earn a postbaccalaureate degree in computer science online from Oregon State University Ecampus.” – Anousha Farshid, OSU Ecampus computer science graduate

Kristen Dhuse, 2017 OSU Ecampus graduate, poses smiling outdoors with her family. Her husband is on the left, Kristen on the right. Between them, seated on a wooden fence, is their daughter Grace.

Plans change. Your career goals don’t have to.

One of the most important items in any parent’s toolkit is the ability to adapt to unexpected change. It’s how we get another meal on the table within minutes of our children spilling their mac and cheese on the floor. Kristen Dhuse discovered the importance of parental improvisation as soon as she and her husband, Ryan, learned they were expecting a child in 2014. Kristen was a successful engineer in the greater Seattle area and had devised a plan to put her professional life on hold while she returned to school in hopes of becoming a software developer.

Albert Diaz lifts up his son Gabriel and the two laugh.

On the right track: Hard work and online learning with OSU Ecampus help this family to a better life

When Albert Diaz gets home and his kids are asleep, he’ll study alongside the only Oregon State student he has met face-to-face: his wife, Samantha, a psychology major. She was the first in the family to enroll with OSU Ecampus. They have never set foot on the Oregon State campus. They both decided to apply to OSU — and become a full-fledged Beaver Nation family — thanks to a Google search. The Diaz family is a fitting example of the benefits of the university’s wildly successful distance education efforts.

Randy Ocampo, Ecampus computer science academic advisor, smiles in an office decorated with pictures.

Behind the scenes with Randy Ocampo, computer science academic advisor

Randy Ocampo knows only one way to live life: full tilt, full time. He spends his days working as an academic advisor to students in the Oregon State Ecampus online postbaccalaureate computer science program. How does he fill the rest of his hours? He has an always-on-the-go family at home, he’s pursuing his MBA on campus with Oregon State, and when he’s not consumed by those two aspects of his life, he’s an avid photographer, paints custom cars, does mixed martial arts and the list goes on.

Justin Wolford, an instructor in the Oregon State Ecampus post-baccalaureate computer science program online, stands on an indoor balcony wearing a black polo shirt.

Behind the scenes with Justin Wolford, computer science instructor

Justin Wolford took awhile to discover that teaching computer science was his desired profession. He earned his bachelor’s degree in communications, then enrolled at Oregon State to pursue a Ph.D. in computer science. After an internship at NASA, he soon realized that he liked teaching more than research, so he exited the CS program after earning his master’s. Now he’s an instructor in OSU’s highly popular, online post-baccalaureate computer science program.

Myles Chatman rests his arms on an indoor balcony in an open room with a wall-length window.

Life after Google is good

Decision to return to school puts computer science grad in driver’s seat By Tyler Hansen Nov. 14, 2016 It takes an uncommon amount of ambition to work for Google and decide that your career’s upward trajectory isn’t quite what you want it to be. That’s where Myles Chatman found himself in 2014. He was working Life after Google is good