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Category Archives: Ecampus Faculty

The augmented reality sandbox used in Permaculture Design and Theory course online shows how landscape design affects water flow.

Out there: Pushing the boundaries of what’s possible in online education

Oregon State Ecampus is home to national award-winning multimedia developers and videographers who partner with OSU faculty to create custom media to be used in Oregon State’s online courses, including videos, animations, virtual field trips, augmented reality, 3D scanning and virtual reality.

Brenda Kellar, Ecampus anthropology advisor. Brenda wears a pink floral patterned button-up shirt and has short gray hair. She is seated in front of a bookshelf across from a person to whom she is speaking.

Anthropology in action explores complex human issues

“I love finding practical ways to make students’ goals a reality.” Ecampus anthropology advisor and instructor Brenda Kellar has been a leader in the anthropology program since Oregon State first began offering the degree online, but as a three-time OSU alumna, her roots go even deeper.

Get help managing mental health as an online student

Without a physical campus location to visit, Oregon State’s online learners needed a clear-cut path to important mental health resources, so Ecampus faculty and staff partnered with Counseling and Psychological Services and the Student Care Team to lay the foundation.

Speech communication professor Colin Hesse wears a brown button-up shirt with white horizontal stripes and his hands are folded on a curved white table in front of him. He is speaking to a person across the table whose head and shoulders are visible from behind. The person has shoulder length reddish-brown hair with light green roots and they wear a dark blue denim jacket. In the background, there is a room with more white tables and red rolling chairs.

At the core of all careers: communication

In all aspects of life, communication is key. Take a look behind the scenes of speech communication associate professor Colin Hesse’s online classrooms, where Oregon State students across all majors gain the skills that are needed to effectively communicate in both face-to-face and digital settings.

Two hands hold a Biltmore stick lengthwise against a tree trunk to measure its diameter.

Behind the Scenes with Dave Stemper, forest ecosystems & society instructor

Whether presenting at a conference, developing an open education resource, coordinating an environmental summer camp for youth, or instructing Oregon State students online and on campus, Dave Stemper’s deep-rooted environmental scholarship has been passed on widely to help shape a thoughtful new generation of natural resource managers and communicators.

Demian Hommel is sitting in front of a large window and two large potted plants. He wears a plaid button up shirt with a black suit jacket and gestures with his hands as he talks. Out of focus in front of him is Mary Ellen Dello Stritto, the Ecampus assistant director of research. Mary Ellen has dark brown hair and wears a vibrant blue shirt and a blue and white scarf.

Rallied by research

When Demian Hommel applied for the Oregon State University Ecampus Research Fellows Program, he carried the seed of an idea: Experiential education can transform a student’s understanding of a concept into real-world circumstances, so it should be offered equally to learners in online and traditional classroom settings. What he didn’t know was that sowing the seed of this idea through his research project could help sprout a grassroots community of advocates like him.

Jenny Sasser stands in a long hallway and smiles. She has chin-length grayish brown hair and wears small, round black glasses; a striped button-up shirt; and a beige knit cloche hat with a black brim.

Portland is her classroom

“It isn’t just that a student can participate in the hybrid program without leaving Portland. They can deepen their education by being right in the middle of the city and exploring Portland from a new vantage point while also being a member of the OSU community.” Instructor, blogger, author, self-described gero-punk and long-time Portlander Jenny Sasser is set to explore the human experience at the university’s new location near Pioneer Square through a mixture of classroom and online instruction.

Oregon State instructor Raven Chakerian is seated in a red office chair in front of a wall with two large windows. She wears a red and white patterned sleeveless shirt, and she holds her arms loosely crossed on the table in front of her.

Behind the scenes with Raven Chakerian, Spanish and Italian instructor

Teaching immediately-applicable skills and guiding students on their multilingual journeys? Now you’re speaking Raven Chakerian’s language. Raven is an online instructor of Spanish and Italian at Oregon State University who realized her passion for languages and communication early on. Even outside of her formal education in Spanish, she pursued language learning through travel, community development, and social interactions. When she joined Oregon State Ecampus five years ago, teaching online was like learning a new language – conquering its challenges and new possibilities, she’s working toward fluency. 

Oregon State professor Byron Crump is in the lab of the Elakha research vessel on an estuary at Yaquina Bay. He is demonstrating the use of lab tools over the sink.

In a classroom without walls, learning can happen anywhere

An education with Oregon State Ecampus can take students places they never expected. And that’s not only because a top-ranked degree opens up new pathways for their futures. Ecampus students often find themselves visiting unfamiliar places to complete their course work through field trips.

A screenshot of the virtual greenhouse used in Alyssa Duval's online classrooms. On the nearest table in the greenhouse, there are several potted plants with white label cards in front of them.

Virtually bringing students closer to nature

Oregon State Ecampus students are experts at adapting to their environment. They turn coffee shops into classrooms and living rooms into lecture halls. But for students taking crop science classes online, they needed a more lifelike way to learn about plants from a distance. And now they’re getting their hands “dirty” by digging into a variety of crops in a 3D virtual greenhouse.