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Oregon State Open Educational Resources Unit

A photo of the facade of the U.S. Supreme Court building. Open educational resources

OER at Work: A volume of original research on judicial politics

Rorie Solberg, an associate professor in OSU’s School of Public Policy, worked with colleagues Jennifer Segal Diascro and Eric Waltenburg to develop a freely available resource that introduces students to the political science research process. Solberg recently discussed the development process, how students are using it and more.

An image of Austin Hall on Oregon State University's Corvallis campus. OER open educational resources

OER at Work: Business instructor enhances course’s real-world experience with open textbook

In the first part of our OER at Work story series, business instructor John Morris shares his insights about the decision to incorporate open educational resources in his course, the development process and more. He was inspired, in part, by the shock he received when he began paying for his child’s college textbooks.

Meet Oregon State’s open educational resources team

Making high-quality education affordable and accessible for students is a critical priority at Oregon State. That’s the mission that has driven OSU’s Open Educational Resources Unit for many years, and it’s one we’re committed to more than ever. In order to help faculty and the OSU community better understand why OER are so critical for student success, the OER Unit’s leadership team answered a series of questions.

The front of the Memorial Union building on Oregon State University's Corvallis campus.

Regional conference on affordability for online students coming to Oregon State

Oregon State University is hosting a regional conference in February 2020 with a focus on improving student success and affordability for online learners. The event brings the Online Learning Consortium to OSU’s Corvallis campus for a one-day event in the Memorial Union. Scheduled for Feb. 7, OLC Collaborate – Oregon will draw faculty, administrators and online learning professionals together to address the opportunities and challenges facing the future of affordability in higher education.

Screen shot of radiographic anatomy module. The radiographic image shows equine leg bones and joints, with two bones highlighted in red.

Open-source module helps alleviate financial burden on VetMed students

Sarah Nemanic, an associate professor of diagnostic imaging in the College of Veterinary Medicine, recently led the creation of a self-study computer module for students, veterinarians and faculty to learn, review and be tested on normal veterinary radiographic anatomy. Not only is it a must-have resource for all VetMed students, but it’s also a free one. Nemanic worked with Open Oregon State to develop an open-source module that is freely accessible to learners all over the world.

Microbiology instructor solves a costly problem for students, increases access to learning

Linda Bruslind estimated that less than half of the students in her General Microbiology course were buying and using the required publisher’s textbook. To put it another way, the majority of her MB 302 students did not have access to vital learning resource in large part because it was cost prohibitive. (A new copy of the latest publisher’s edition runs nearly $250.) She decided to fix the problem.

An orange background with white text that reads "2018 Division of Extended Campus awards." The Oregon State University logo is in the bottom-right corner.

At the forefront of innovation

The annual Oregon State University Division of Extended Campus Awards recognize faculty partners who have gone above and beyond to improve the learning environment and outcomes for distance students.

Oregon State physics instructor K.C. Walsh writes on a lightboard (a transparent whiteboard that allows the instructor to face their students as they write or draw).

The future of education is wide open

K.C. Walsh, a senior instructor of physics at Oregon State University, long ago realized how burdensome the financial situation is for students. In sports terms, the textbook publishing companies are winning, and it’s a blowout. Financially, the students continually come up short. That’s why Walsh decided to change the game by embracing the open educational resource (OER) movement and giving his students access to no-cost and low-cost course materials.