Credits required
180 Oregon State University is on a quarter-term system. There are four quarters each year and classes are 11 weeks long. This program's 180 quarter credits are equal to 120 semester credits.*
Cost per credit
$318 Cost per credit is calculated using tuition per credit for the current academic year. It does not include associated fees, course materials, textbook expenses, and other expenses related to courses.
Delivery
Online You can complete all or nearly all requirements of this program online. View the curriculum.
Start terms
4 per year

B.A./B.S. in Economics – Online

Careers

Oregon State's economics online degree program is flexible and allows students to pursue a wide range of career goals based on their interests.

Know your value

According to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, people with a bachelor's degree earn on average 64 percent more per week than those with a high school diploma. The difference in total earnings over the course of a person's career could be as much as $1 million.

Sample job titles of economics graduates

  • Financial analyst
  • Staff accountant
  • Business analyst
  • Management consultant
  • Financial controller
  • Economist
  • Financial advisor
  • Securities trader
  • Loan officer
  • Marketing research analyst
  • Investment banker
  • Forecaster
  • Project manager

Additional career information can be found on the Department of Economics website.

The Oregon State University Career Development Center is also a great resource for career information.

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