Fisheries ManagementGraduate Certificate

Credits required
18 Oregon State University is on a quarter-term system. There are four quarters each year and classes are 11 weeks long. This program's 18 quarter credits are equal to 12 semester credits.
Cost per credit
$528
Delivery
Online You can complete all courses online. Some courses may require proctored exams in your local area.
Start terms
3 per year

Faculty: Graduate Certificate in Fisheries Management – Online

The online Fisheries Management Graduate Certificate thrives on the expertise of many OSU faculty in a wide-reaching span of relevant disciplines to prepare students to handle fisheries management issues from a range of perspectives.

Program leaderBruce Dugger - Associate Professor, Fisheries and Wildlife

Bruce Dugger, Ph.D – Associate Professor, Fisheries and Wildlife
Specialty in ecology, conservation, and management of waterbirds, particularly waterfowl, and their wetland habitats. Ongoing research includes: understanding factors that limit populations of wintering waterfowl; biological theory behind development of conservation plans; avian behavioral ecology and evolution of life history parameters; ecology and conservation of rare waterbirds; wetland management and restoration to meet life history needs of waterbird communities.
Bruce’s website

Additional instructors

The following faculty are involved in the Graduate Certificate in Fisheries Management.

Lori Cramer, Ph.D. –  Associate Professor, Sociology
Specialties include: natural resource sociology, environmental sociology, social impact assessment and rural sociology. Research focuses on resource use and social change in Oregon communities, including challenges in Pacific Northwest fishing communities.

Sandra DeBano, Ph.D. – Associate Professor, Fisheries and Wildlife
Specialty in riparian ecology and terrestrial invertebrates. Research focuses on the roles that terrestrial invertebrates play in linking riparian areas with adjacent streams and uplands, especially in arid and semi-arid lands.

Scott Heppell, Ph.D.  Assistant Professor, Fisheries and Wildlife
Specialty in physiological and behavioral ecology. Research interests include the physiological ecology of marine fishes, in particular how physiology, behavior and life history traits affect the interactions between marine fish stocks and their respective fisheries.
Scott's website

Robert Lackey, Ph.D.  Professor, Fisheries and Wildlife and Adjunct Professor, Political Science
Expertise includes: ecological policy, salmon restoration, biological resource management, fisheries and wildlife management, environmental protection and ecological risk assessment.
Robert's website

Anita Morzillo, Ph.D. – Assistant Professor, Forest Ecosystems and Society
Research interests include landscape ecology, systems ecology, wildlife ecology, human dimensions of wildlife and natural resources, urban ecology, and integrating ecology and social science

David Noakes, Ph.D. – Professor and Senior Scientist, Oregon Hatchery Research Center
Specialties in ichthyology and animal behavior. Research interests include social behavior, early development and behavior, ecology and life history, evolution and polymorphism.

James Peterson, Ph.D. – Associate Professor, Fisheries and Wildlife
Specialties include lotic ecology, quantitative decision analysis, population estimation and modeling, sample design and estimation. Research focuses on multiple aspects of aquatic ecology, with an emphasis on stream fish communities.

David Sampson, Ph.D.  Professor, Fisheries and Wildlife
Expertise includes: marine fisheries science, population dynamics and stock assessment. Research includes: development of models of fishermen's behavior with regard to choices for fishing location and fishing technology, bioeconomic models of the fish stock-fishermen system and methods for assessing the status of fish stocks.
David's website

Brent Steel, Ph.D.  Professor, Political Science
Director of the Master of Public Policy Program. Expertise in environmental and natural resource policy issues from a domestic and international perspective. Fisheries-related research explores knowledge and values and how these shape attitudes towards and development of marine policy.
Brent's website

Bryan Tilt, Ph.D.  Assistant Professor, Anthropology
Research interests are environmental anthropology, anthropology of work, rural development, risk assessment and perception and marine resource management.

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