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Author Archives: Julie Cooper

Get help managing mental health as an online student

Without a physical campus location to visit, Oregon State’s online learners needed a clear-cut path to important mental health resources, so Ecampus faculty and staff partnered with Counseling and Psychological Services and the Student Care Team to lay the foundation.

Oregon State Ecampus liberal studies alumna Janine Romero stands on a balcony speaking to another person with short, dark hair who is facing Janine with their back to the camera. Janine is one of several Ecampus alumni who shared about the process of building a network and communication skills while earning an Oregon State degree online.

Despite distance, online learners build lasting connections

Oregon State University’s online learners do what many say can’t be done: form genuine connections in the digital classroom. Ecampus alumni from the Class of 2018 shared how their interactions with peers and instructors went far beyond the computer screen, providing the opportunity to polish their communication skills and collaborate with others in their fields.

Speech communication professor Colin Hesse wears a brown button-up shirt with white horizontal stripes and his hands are folded on a curved white table in front of him. He is speaking to a person across the table whose head and shoulders are visible from behind. The person has shoulder length reddish-brown hair with light green roots and they wear a dark blue denim jacket. In the background, there is a room with more white tables and red rolling chairs.

At the core of all careers: communication

In all aspects of life, communication is key. Take a look behind the scenes of speech communication associate professor Colin Hesse’s online classrooms, where Oregon State students across all majors gain the skills that are needed to effectively communicate in both face-to-face and digital settings.

Janine Romero and her husband, Lee, walk through a dry grassy area holding hands. Janine is looking at Lee and both are smiling. Janine wears blue jeans and a red-toned plaid shirt and Lee wears his military uniform.

‘Choose your own adventure’ in online liberal studies degree program

Janine Romero didn’t settle until she found the perfect degree online: a military-friendly university that offered a rigorous and well-rounded education to fulfill her interest in both the humanities and the sciences.

Heather Bell, radiation health physics student, sits outdoors on the OSU Corvallis campus.

Radiation health physics student represents U.S. nuclear policy overseas

It’s difficult to give people all the right answers. But she’s willing to try. Heather Bell’s decision to return to school doesn’t only serve her own best interests by providing a new scientific skill set to advance her career – her expanding expertise will also answer important questions about global nuclear policy and protection.

Fisheries and wildlife sciences alumna Jordan wears a blue dress and beige cardigan and carries a tablet in the bend of her left arm. She is walking forward, away from a blurred background of dark green trees and red brick.

Experiential learning led to flourishing career prospects for fisheries and wildlife sciences alumna

New textbooks, classmates from all over the world, the cover of the forest, calls from birds unseen, the fresh smell of soil (and sometimes fish). These are all the well-known staples of a college classroom. At least, that’s what Jordan Levi came to expect of her learning environments while enrolled online in the Oregon State University Ecampus fisheries and wildlife sciences bachelor’s degree program.

Two hands hold a Biltmore stick lengthwise against a tree trunk to measure its diameter.

Behind the Scenes with Dave Stemper, forest ecosystems & society instructor

Whether presenting at a conference, developing an open education resource, coordinating an environmental summer camp for youth, or instructing Oregon State students online and on campus, Dave Stemper’s deep-rooted environmental scholarship has been passed on widely to help shape a thoughtful new generation of natural resource managers and communicators.

Demian Hommel is sitting in front of a large window and two large potted plants. He wears a plaid button up shirt with a black suit jacket and gestures with his hands as he talks. Out of focus in front of him is Mary Ellen Dello Stritto, the Ecampus assistant director of research. Mary Ellen has dark brown hair and wears a vibrant blue shirt and a blue and white scarf.

Rallied by research

When Demian Hommel applied for the Oregon State University Ecampus Research Fellows Program, he carried the seed of an idea: Experiential education can transform a student’s understanding of a concept into real-world circumstances, so it should be offered equally to learners in online and traditional classroom settings. What he didn’t know was that sowing the seed of this idea through his research project could help sprout a grassroots community of advocates like him.

Maria Carpenter sits outside with a silver laptop on her lap. She is looking at the laptop and smiling. Green foliage and red brick buildings are visible in the background.

With a dream at close range, no obstacle is too great

No obstacle could stand in the way as Maria Carpenter pursued her agricultural sciences degree – not her additional responsibilities as a parent and employee, nor a breast cancer diagnosis that came shortly after beginning her degree program.

Jenny Sasser stands in a long hallway and faces the camera with a slight smile. She has chin-length grayish brown hair and wears small, round black glasses, a blue and white striped button-up shirt, and a beige knit cloche hat with a black brim.

Portland is her classroom

“It isn’t just that a student can participate in the hybrid program without leaving Portland. They can deepen their education by being right in the middle of the city and exploring Portland from a new vantage point while also being a member of the OSU community.” Instructor, blogger, author, self-described gero-punk and long-time Portlander Jenny Sasser is set to explore the human experience at the university’s new location near Pioneer Square through a mixture of classroom and online instruction.