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Ecampus Research Fellows

2018-19 fellows and projects


Andrew Bouwma

Andrew Bouwma

College of Science

Abstract: Testing the Efficacy and Student Acceptance of a Peer-Review Writing Program in an Online Course

Proposed research abstract
Writing within Disciplines (WID) is a pedagogical model that aims to engage students in active learning and to develop critical thinking and writing skills within the norms of a particular discipline, but lack of faculty time for grading writing products impedes its broader implementation. Web based peer review programs have been developed that allow for writing assignments in large classes without overburdening instructors. Yet unknowns and barriers remain regarding successful implementation of these programs, notably efficacy in online courses and students’ comfort with and acceptance of the programs. The principle investigator (PI) is piloting the peer-review writing program, Peerceptiv, and has received student survey feedback that both suggests positive learning outcomes from Peerceptiv assignments and some resistance to the peer-review process. The proposed research focuses on two major questions: 1) To what extent will students in an online science course show writing gains in Peerceptiv assignments? 2) Do students’ exposure to evidence from the literature that demonstrates the value of peer feedback for their writing, and to reminders of the robust course policies for appeal of scores, impact their perceptions of Peerceptiv assignments? The proposed research will measure writing related learning gains in an online course over multiple Peerceptiv writing assignments, and will survey student acceptance of peer-review after exposure to informational video interventions relative to a control group. The findings of the study will be useful to share with faculty and students and will help facilitate the implementation of WID programs in online courses at OSU and beyond.

Proposal: View as a PDF


Lori Cramer

Lori Cramer

College of Liberal Arts

Abstract: Social Sustainability: An Engaged Approach

Proposed research abstract
Utilizing SOC381 ‘Social Dimensions of Sustainability’ as a case study, this project proposes to develop teaching strategies and learning outcome assessments from an innovative course that requires experiential learning, in the form of civic engagement. This project centers on a ‘Social Dimensions of Sustainability’ course premised on the interconnectedness of social justice, the environment, and the economy. Since learning takes place beyond, as well as within the classroom, it is important for all students to effectively experience such learning opportunities. Civic engagement is a method for increasing the meaning and relevance of classroom-based activities for students. It can also build a sense of citizenship and increase their involvement in the community. Yet, such efforts have been slower to develop for online students. The goal of this project is to assess civic engagement learning for both on campus and online students taking the same course. The project will identify opportunities and challenges to incorporating civic engagement as a pedagogical tool to advance students’ deeper understanding of the complex pillar of social sustainability.

Proposal: View as a PDF


Yvette Gibson

Yvette Gibson

Susan Fein

Susan Fein, Instructional Designer Fellow

College of Agriculture Sciences

Abstract: Evaluating the Efficacy of Teaching Field-Based Science Online

Proposed research abstract
OSU is a leader in delivering online education, including several field-based programs and dozens of courses with field-based aspects. However, accrediting entities such as Society of Range Management and The Wildlife Society question the ability of students to achieve the unique program and course learning outcomes of a field-based science. They cite general differences in face-to-face and online learning environments, and the ability to teach concepts and skills that are traditionally taught during face-to-face field labs and field trips. To the best of our knowledge, no individuals or entities have undertaken investigation comparing the pedagogies, methods, and student learning outcome achievement between face-to-face and online learning in field-based disciplines. We propose to undertake such a comparison through an innovative research design focused on Rangeland Science and Fisheries and Wildlife Sciences courses that are taught in both learning environments; some taught by the same instructor, some taught by different instructors but same course design; and some taught by different instructors with different course designs. Evaluation of student work in each course and concomitant learning outcome achievement will be conducted by non-OSU teaching faculty and working professionals to reduce bias and increase credibility of results. In addition, the pedagogies, structure, and methods of all courses in the study will be compared, and then correlated to evaluation of student learning outcome achievement. The scope of this proposal is the second phase in a three-phase research project that aims to: 1.) Identify overall differences between face-to-face and online learning environments within field-based disciplines. 2.) Compare the course structure, methods, and student learning outcome achievement in field-based courses between face-to-face and online learning environments. 3.) Identify best practices in teaching field based science and integral skills online. 4.) Position OSU as a leader in the discussion of teaching field-based science online.


Ganapathy Natarajan

Ganapathy Natarajan

College of Engineering

Abstract: Student Perception of Fairness in Ecampus Testing Methods

Proposed research abstract
Student satisfaction and positive attitude towards courses taken are important in the success of any educational program. One of the key factors affecting satisfaction and attitude is the student’s perception of fairness towards the classes taken (Swan, Shen, & Hiltz, 2006). In case of Ecampus/online classes, it is harder for instructors to convey this fairness and for students to provide feedback, compared to on-campus classes. With the Ecampus program growing, attention must be given to how students perceive fairness in evaluation methods in online classrooms. This project concentrates on a particular element of course evaluation – tests/exams. This project will propose a research model and use data collected from survey research to establish the relationship between testing methods and student perception of fairness.


Matthew Nyman

Matthew Nyman

College of Education

Abstract: An Exploration of the Influence of Hybrid Online Courses and Clinical Experience in Facilitating Transfer of Theory to Practice for Teacher Candidates

Proposed research abstract
The Masters of Arts in Teaching – Clinically Based Elementary Education program working in deep collaboration with the Teach for Beaverton effort is seeking to redefine teacher preparation through development and implementation of a financially self-sustaining, clinically-immersive and hybrid online preparation program. A unique part of the program model, which resembles a medical residency program, includes opportunities for teacher candidates to make a salary and stipends for clinical teachers commensurate with their experience and time investment in the program. For this program to be successful, we must demonstrate that the fully online and online hybrid courses provide learning experiences that build pedagogical knowledge and skills by linking educational research and theory to classroom practice. This includes learning and applying culturally relevant teaching practices required to work with diverse student populations. Using data from observations of classroom teaching, interviews and course artifacts we will explore how teacher candidates manifest connections between research/theory and classroom practice. We will use this data to adjust course content and activities to optimize this transfer and improve teacher candidate learning experiences.


Kenneth (KC) Walsh

Kenneth (KC) Walsh

College of Science

Abstract: Project BoxSand: Correlation Data Mining Students’ Engagement with Open Resources to Inform Meaningful Interventions

Proposed research abstract
As more learning happens in online environments, detailed study of the efficacy of different learning tools is needed. Evidence from preliminary analysis of BoxSand.org interactions (an open resource website created at OSU to teach introductory physics both on and off campus) shows promise in providing a venue for this kind of study. The website has fine-grain tracking of students’ use of its learning modules and resources so that Correlation Data Mining (CDM) can be performed to find correlations between students’ study behavior and performance in the class. To move this research forward, I have two major goals:

  1. Perform higher level statistical analysis on BoxSand’s dataset and solidify a set of correlations to analyze in a long-term study.
  2. Disseminate the knowledge gained in peer reviewed journals and educational conferences.

Project BoxSand enables a unique opportunity to simultaneously provide free access to, and validate the efficacy of, online learning tools and resources. This fellowship would provide support to take a foundational step towards building a knowledge base of how shared learning resources are used. That information can then be used to build adaptive, customized online learning environments. The long-term goal of BoxSand is to determine which open learning tools and which paths through those tools are best for a customized learning experience.