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Ecampus Research Fellows

Funded projects 2023


Iván Carbajal
Iván Carbajal
Steven Sanders
Steven Sanders

College of Liberal Arts: School of Psychological Science

Racial Literacy Development in Online Courses

Research and literature on undergraduate instruction of psychology of race and racism in online courses is limited. Past research that has examined similar face-to-face (F2F) courses, such as multicultural psychology, have shown that courses that teach about culture have positive learning outcomes for students. Courses like these have been shown to effectively promote multicultural knowledge, increase students’ cultural competence, and boost student ethnic identity (Soto et al., 2021). The primary objective of this project is to identify whether an online course on race and racism serve as an intervention in increasing racial literacy. This work will help identify if an online course on race and racism is as effective as a F2F course in teaching students’ racial literacy and provide pilot data for grant application for our planned follow-up study.


Kathryn McIntosh
Kathryn McIntosh

College of Education

Evaluation of Online Learning Tools as Spaces for Collaborative Social Justice Dialogue

This project proposes a study of online course features such as discussion boards as spaces for social justice dialogue and learning among BIPOC (Black and Indigenous People of Color) and white undergraduate students. Students are enrolled in an online course focused on social justice and multiculturalism in education. Our conceptualization of social justice learning is aligned with Torres’ (2013) as “an examination of systems, organizational processes, institutional dynamics, rules, mores, and regulations, including prevailing traditions and customs” that perpetuate racism and oppression (p. 670). Throughout the progression of the course, students will engage in learning and dialogue on such topics as racism, gender oppression, and privilege. Given the emotionality and provocativeness of such topics, we are interested in how discussion boards function as platforms for students to engage in meaningful social justice dialogue in a supportive online setting.


Kate Shay
Kate Shay

College of Science: School of Biochemistry and Biophysics

Contextual and Intentionally Designed Community-Building Activities in Upper-division Online Biochemistry Courses

Designing courses with student-student interaction to support student-centered learning results in feelings of community-building, but can be difficult to implement in asynchronous, online environments. In fact, STEM courses still predominantly use didactic methods despite the reported superiority of student-centered learning (Stains, 2018). Successful activities that build community between students in an online course may range from open-ended discussion boards to intentionally directed exercises. These more intentional activities can be designated as “designed” activities, whereas activities that provide open opportunities for students to interact are called “contextual” (Borokhovski, 2012). This project aims to measure students’ feelings of community in an OSU Ecampus Biochemistry course after completing tasks that are either designed, contextual, or neither (control). Two types of designed activities will be tested: one game-oriented activity and one task-oriented activity. They will be compared with each other as well as with a contextual activity and a control. The outcomes of this study will help guide best practices for activities to be implemented in future courses, as well as provide pilot data for future research into building a feeling of community between students in online courses.