Online Learning Efficacy Research Database

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Showing 11 - 17 of 17 citations  |  Clear filters
A multi-semester comparison of student performance between multiple traditional and online sections of two management courses.
Friday, E., Friday-Stroud, S. S., Green, A. L., Hill, A. Y.
This multi-semester (eight semesters), multi-course study compared student performance in undergraduate online and traditional sections of “Organization and Management” with sample sizes of 380 and 213, respectively. Concurrent … [more]
This multi-semester (eight semesters), multi-course study compared student performance in undergraduate online and traditional sections of “Organization and Management” with sample sizes of 380 and 213, respectively. Concurrent online and traditional sections of “Strategic Management” courses with sample sizes of 298 and 456, respectively, were also comparatively analyzed. Similar to previous research (Borthick & Jones, 2000; Gagne & Shepherd, 2001; Piccoli, Ahman, Ives, 2001), this study found no statistically significant difference in student performance between online and traditional classes in both management courses after examining eight semesters of data. However, this study found gender differences with both management courses. 
Full-texts of the citations in the database are protected by copyright. If you would like to read the full articles, please check your academic library. For more information, read the FAQ.
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2006, Journal of Behavioral and Applied Management, 8(1), 66-81.
Business  |   Traditional, Fully online  |   1,347 Undergraduate
Motivation to learn and course outcomes: The impact of delivery mode, learning goal orientation, and perceived barriers and enablers.
Klein, H. J., Noe, R. A., Wang, C.
This naturally occurring quasi-experiment examined how learning goal orientation (LGO), delivery mode (classroom vs. blended learning), and the perception of barriers and enablers related to motivation to learn … [more]
This naturally occurring quasi-experiment examined how learning goal orientation (LGO), delivery mode (classroom vs. blended learning), and the perception of barriers and enablers related to motivation to learn and course outcomes. Study participants were 600 students enrolled in either classroom or blended learning courses. As hypothesized, learners in the blended learning condition, high in LGO, and who perceived environmental features as enablers rather than barriers had significantly higher motivation to learn. Motivation to learn, in turn, was significantly related to course outcomes (satisfaction, metacognition, and grades). The mediation hypotheses received partial support. Finally, exploratory analyses revealed 3 significant interactions between delivery mode, LGO, and perceived barriers and enablers on motivation to learn and course satisfaction. 
Full-texts of the citations in the database are protected by copyright. If you would like to read the full articles, please check your academic library. For more information, read the FAQ.
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2006, Personnel Psychology, 59(3), 665-702.
  |   Business  |   Traditional, Blended/hybrid  |   600 Undergraduate
E-learning compared with face to face: differences in the academic achievement of postgraduate business students.
Ladyshewsky, R. K.
The use of information technology in higher education has increased significantly over the years. There is a paucity of controlled research which examines differences in electronic learning (EL) … [more]
The use of information technology in higher education has increased significantly over the years. There is a paucity of controlled research which examines differences in electronic learning (EL) and face to face (F2F) learning. This study examined student (n = 1401) performance (final grade) in nine units offered in both F2F and EL mode over the course of two years. The effect of age and gender was also considered. Students, on average, did better in the EL mode although at the individual unit level there were minimal if any significant differences. Age and gender did not appear to moderate performance in any way except for those students under 33 who did better, on average, in the EL mode. The implications for teaching and learning in virtual mediums are discussed. 
Full-texts of the citations in the database are protected by copyright. If you would like to read the full articles, please check your academic library. For more information, read the FAQ.
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2004, Australasian Journal of Educational Technology, 20(3), 316.
  |   Business  |   Traditional, Fully online  |   1,401 Graduate
Using technology to enhance a course: The importance of interaction.
Keefe, T. J.
Describes studies with undergraduate business students concerning the use of technology for teaching. Findings indicated that the commonly-accepted “no-significant-difference effect” did not occur; in fact, students performed better … [more]
Describes studies with undergraduate business students concerning the use of technology for teaching. Findings indicated that the commonly-accepted “no-significant-difference effect” did not occur; in fact, students performed better when offered face-to-face interactions 
Full-texts of the citations in the database are protected by copyright. If you would like to read the full articles, please check your academic library. For more information, read the FAQ.
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2003, Educause Quarterly, 26(1), 24-34.
  |   Business  |   Traditional, Fully online  |   35 Undergraduate
Distance education: better, worse, or as good as traditional education?
Tucker, S.
This study examined pre-test and post-test scores, homework grades, research paper grades, final exam scores, final course grades, learning styles, and ages of distance education and traditional students … [more]
This study examined pre-test and post-test scores, homework grades, research paper grades, final exam scores, final course grades, learning styles, and ages of distance education and traditional students enrolled in a business communications class to determine if distance education is better, worse, or as good as traditional education. Significant differences were found for post-test scores, final exam scores, and age. There were no significant differences in pre-test scores, homework grades, research paper grades, and final course grades. Both groups preferred clearly organized coursework and performing at an above-average level--ranking in the top 25 to 33% of their class. Recommendations for research include investigating student social interaction and increasing the number of classes studied to compare results. 
Full-texts of the citations in the database are protected by copyright. If you would like to read the full articles, please check your academic library. For more information, read the FAQ.
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2001, Online Journal of Distance Learning Administration, 4(4).
  |   Business  |   Traditional, Fully online  |   47 Undergraduate
Achievement predictors for a computer-applications module delivered online.
Wallace, P. E., Clariana, R. B.
The program evaluation compared student achievement and self-report data in two types of learning environments—atraditional classroom environment and an online learning environment to examine the comparative … [more]
The program evaluation compared student achievement and self-report data in two types of learning environments—a
traditional classroom environment and an online learning environment to examine the comparative effectiveness of online delivery, to identify characteristics of successful and unsuccessful distance learning students, and to gauge degree of satisfaction with online delivery. Undergraduate students (N=93) enrolled in four sections of Business 100, Computer Fundamentals, were assigned by section to complete a 4-weeks long spreadsheet module either in class (control) or online (experimental). The online instruction was delivered via a website and was supplemented with email and listserv discussion. Posttest findings revealed no significant differences in knowledge gain between the control (M = .75) and online (M = .77) groups, indicating that this online module was at least as effective as the traditional classroom instruction. Post hoc analysis of achievement data showed that more capable students working online scored significantly better (p<.01) than the more capable control group. Self-report measures compared to achievement indicated that frequent computer users benefited most from online delivery, while frequent computer use was not a factor in the control group's performance. Also competitiveness had a negative correlation with achievement for the online group but not for the control group. In summary, this online instruction provided an effective standardized course delivery. However low-prior knowledge students who are less frequent computer users were not served well by this online instruction. 
Full-texts of the citations in the database are protected by copyright. If you would like to read the full articles, please check your academic library. For more information, read the FAQ.
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2000, Journal of Information Systems Education, 11(1/2), 13–18.
  |   Business  |   Traditional, Fully online  |   93 Undergraduate
Asynchronous computer-mediated communication versus face-to-face collaboration: Results on student learning, quality and satisfaction.
Ocker, R. J., Yaverbaum, G. J.
Although there has been more than a decade of literature on computer-mediated communication in education, the research has been unclear as to whether it is an effective replacement … [more]
Although there has been more than a decade of literature on computer-mediated communication in education, the research has been unclear as to whether it is an effective replacement for face-to-face (FtF) collaboration. This study sought to add to this body of research by exploring the effects of two modes of collaboration on student groups. Following a repeated-measures experimental design, each student group collaborated on two case studies, one using face-to-face collaboration and the other using asynchronous computer conferencing technology as a means of collaboration. Empirical findings indicate that asynchronous collaboration is as effective as face-to-face collaboration in terms of learning, quality of solution, solution content, and satisfaction with the solution quality. However, students were significantly less satisfied with the asynchronous learning experience, both in terms of the group interaction process and the quality of group discussions. 
Full-texts of the citations in the database are protected by copyright. If you would like to read the full articles, please check your academic library. For more information, read the FAQ.
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1999, Group Decision and Negotiation, 8(5), 427-440.
  |   Business  |   Traditional, Web-facilitated  |   43 Graduate
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This Ecampus Research Unit project is a searchable resource of academic studies of education efficacy across modalities. Filter by discipline or journal to find research in your subject area of interest. View overview or read the FAQ.

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