Online Learning Efficacy Research Database

Filters

Modality

 
 
 
 

Peer-​reviewed

 

Sample



Showing 1 - 10 of 288 citations
Student learning performance and satisfaction with traditional face-to-face classroom versus online learning:Evidence from teaching statistics for business.
Lin, T., Lin, T.C.
In this research, we investigated whether business students enrolled in a statistics course gained more by engaging in traditional face-to-face (FTF) learning or online learning. Empirical evidence suggested … [more]
In this research, we investigated whether business students enrolled in a statistics course gained more by engaging in traditional face-to-face (FTF) learning or online learning. Empirical evidence suggested that students learned statistics more effectively when engaged with an instructor in a traditional FTF classroom versus through online learning; however, when the option of teaching virtually in fully online (ONL) classes was available, students successfully learned about statistics whether in a traditional FTF classroom or a ONL learning experience. In addition, evidence suggested that students’ overall satisfaction with the course and the instructor was higher in the FTF setting than in the ONL setting. Evidence also suggested that offering online zoom lecture meetings in the ONL setting remarkably enhanced students’ satisfaction with the course and the instructor and, importantly, reduced the gap in effective instruction between traditional FTF and ONL settings. 
Full-texts of the citations in the database are protected by copyright. If you would like to read the full articles, please check your academic library. For more information, read the FAQ.
[less]
2022, E-Learning and Digital Media, 19(3), 340-360.
  |   Statistics  |   Traditional, Fully online  |   124 Undergraduate
Comparison of in-person and virtual labs/tutorials for engineering students using blended learning principles.
Schnieder, M. , Williams, S., Ghosh, S.
The paper compares the effectiveness of in-person and virtual engineering laboratory sessions. The in-person and virtual laboratory sessions reported here comprise six experiments combined with short tutorials. The … [more]
The paper compares the effectiveness of in-person and virtual engineering laboratory sessions. The in-person and virtual laboratory sessions reported here comprise six experiments combined with short tutorials. The virtual lab combined enquiry-based learning and gamification principles. The integration of the virtual labs with in-person teaching created a blended learning environment. The effectiveness of this approach was assessed based on (i) the student feedback (i.e., a questionnaire with open-ended questions and Likert scale feedback), (ii) the students’ engagement with the virtual lab, and (iii) the impact on the academic performance (i.e., class test results). The students reported greater confidence in the understanding of theory in the virtual lab than the in-person lab. This is interesting given that the instruction for the virtual lab and the in-person lab of one experiment is identical (i.e., same instructor, same enquiry-based learning techniques, and same explanations). The students also appreciated the ability to complete the virtual lab anytime, anywhere, for as long as they needed, and highlighted the benefits of the interactivity. The median class test scores of the students who completed some or all the virtual lab experiments was higher than those who did not (83–89% vs. 67%). 
Full-texts of the citations in the database are protected by copyright. If you would like to read the full articles, please check your academic library. For more information, read the FAQ.
[less]
2022, Education Sciences, 12(3), 153-171.
  |   Engineering  |   Traditional, Fully online  |   118 Unknown
Comparison of blended versus traditional classrooms among undergraduate nursing students: A quasi-experimental study
Alshawish, E., El-Banna, M. M. , Alrimawi, I.
Background: Blended learning is a relatively new educational approach that has been introduced into higher education in Palestine. While it has many advantages, there is no empirical evidence, … [more]
Background: Blended learning is a relatively new educational approach that has been introduced into higher education in Palestine. While it has many advantages, there is no empirical evidence, nor any case studies from Palestine to support the use of blended learning over traditional classroom.
Objectives: To compare students’ learning outcomes, learning perceptions of their educational environment, and satisfaction of blended learning versus traditional classroom. Design: A quasi-experimental study.
Setting: A public university in Palestine. Participants: 102 Bachelor of Science in nursing students enrolled on the maternal health course.
Methods: Students freely chose to register for the blended teaching section (49 students) or traditional classroom (53 students), then the teaching method for each section was assigned. Student demographics, course component grades, perceptions of the educational environment, measured by the Arabic version of Dundee Ready Education Environment Measurement (DREEM) inventory, and degree of satisfaction were collected in this study. Descriptive statistics and the Independent Sample t-test were used to analyze the data.
Results: The sample included 49 students in the blended teaching section and 53 students in the traditional section. Overall DREEM scores, Student Perceptions of Learning, and Student Perceptions of Teachers were significantly higher for students taught with the blended method compared to traditional classroom settings. The total DREEM scores were between 101 and 151 for both sections, indicating that all students, regardless of teaching method, had more positive than negative perceptions of their educational environment. Moreover, there was no significant difference in scores and total course GPA (Grade Point Average), both with and without assignment grades, or between blended and traditional learning in first, second and final exams. However, students taught with the blended format scored significantly higher in assignments than students taught the traditional classroom.
Conclusions: Blended learning can be a useful educational approach in nursing education and Palestinian universities may consider using it for nursing courses. 
Full-texts of the citations in the database are protected by copyright. If you would like to read the full articles, please check your academic library. For more information, read the FAQ.
[less]
2021, Nurse Education Today, 106, 1-7.
  |   Nursing Education  |   Traditional, Blended/hybrid  |   102 Undergraduate
The best of both worlds? A controlled comparison of hybrid and online economics student outcomes.
Babin, J. J. , Feld, T., Harriger-Lin, J., Mitchell, K.
This paper systematically compares undergraduate student learning outcomes between hybrid and online learning formats in Principles of Macroeconomics classes. Exploiting a quasi-experimental design that controls for instructor effects, … [more]
This paper systematically compares undergraduate student learning outcomes between hybrid and online learning formats in Principles of Macroeconomics classes. Exploiting a quasi-experimental design that controls for instructor effects, student characteristics, effort, and experience, we find that students registered for a hybrid section perform worse than similar students in a nearly identical online section across two metrics. We determine that the factors influencing success in each format and attribute lower student performance in hybrid sections to mismatched student expectations of the blended learning format. 
Full-texts of the citations in the database are protected by copyright. If you would like to read the full articles, please check your academic library. For more information, read the FAQ.
[less]
2021, Journal of Education for Business, 97(1), 43-53.
  |   Business  |   Blended/hybrid, Fully online  |   36 Undergraduate
Comparing learning outcomes and satisfaction of an online algebra-based physics course with a face-to-face course.
Bergeler, E., Read, M. F.
This study aimed to compare the online and face-to-face teaching of a required algebra-based physics course for non-physics majors in large-enrollment course sections. The study design is quasi-experimental; … [more]
This study aimed to compare the online and face-to-face teaching of a required algebra-based physics course for non-physics majors in large-enrollment course sections. The study design is quasi-experimental; the students self-selected to enroll in either the fully online and asynchronous course or the face-to-face course. In this study, we look at pre- and post-surveys, test grades, and course grades. A total of 116 students from both the face-to-face version (n = 76) and the online version (n = 40) of the course participated in this study. Both courses were taught by the same instructor and covered the same topics using identical homework, quizzes, and tests to ensure comparison fidelity. Findings show that general physics students do equally well in both face-to-face and online versions of the course. However, online students show a higher rate of satisfaction of the course. 
Full-texts of the citations in the database are protected by copyright. If you would like to read the full articles, please check your academic library. For more information, read the FAQ.
[less]
2021, Journal of Science Education and Technology, 30(1), 97-111.
  |   Physics  |   Traditional, Fully online  |   116 Undergraduate
Evaluating learning outcomes and assessing social work skill development: Comparing online vs. in-person education.
Canada, K. E. , Freese, R. A., Bailey, R. M., Fitch, D.
This article presents results from an evaluation of learning outcomes in a social work skills class between online and in-person students. Students were compared on background and academic … [more]
This article presents results from an evaluation of learning outcomes in a social work skills class between online and in-person students. Students were compared on background and academic factors, including grade point average prior to graduate school, time since completion of undergraduate education, undergraduate degree, and previous work and training in social services. Students also completed a skills self-assessment at the beginning of the class and upon completion. Data used to measure learning outcomes included total points earned and grades. Data were also collected from instructors’ field notes and observations. Data were analyzed using descriptive statistics and bivariate analyses, including one way and repeated measure ANOVA. Online students perceived they entered the class with more skills but no differences existed at the post-assessment. Minimal differences existed in students’ scores on major assignments except the bio-psycho-social assessment; in-person students scored higher. Instructors identified rapport building online as challenging. Results suggest parity of online and in-person learning. It is important to continue researching which students do best in--online and in-person coursework--in order to assist students in making the best choices for their learning preferences. 
Full-texts of the citations in the database are protected by copyright. If you would like to read the full articles, please check your academic library. For more information, read the FAQ.
[less]
2021, Journal of Technology in Human Services, 1-11.
  |   Social Work  |   Traditional, Fully online  |   82 Graduate
Comparative Analysis of Generation Z Era Students’ Overall Grades and Course Satisfaction of a Basic Floral Design Course Taught Fully Face-to-face versus an Online Hybrid Format
Etheredge, C. L., Waliczek, T. M.
As Generation Z (born 1995–2012) students replace Millennial (born 1981–94) students on college campuses, instructors may begin to evaluate and structure their courses based on how … [more]
As Generation Z (born 1995–2012) students replace Millennial (born 1981–94) students on college campuses, instructors may begin to evaluate and structure their courses based on how this new generation best learns. Generation Z students were exposed to such things as the internet, smart phones, personal computers, and laptops since infancy and, hence, are very comfortable with technology and multitasking. The purpose of this study was to compare students’ overall grades and perceptions of the course and instructor in a face-to-face vs. an online/hybrid basic floral design course taken by a majority Generation Z student population. The face-to-face course consisted of live lectures that met twice per week for 50 min at an assigned time; reading materials and standard lecture slides were used. The hybrid course had content placed online within weekly modules and released to students in an asynchronous manner each Monday. Both versions of the course had a face-to-face laboratory that met once per week. Comparisons of grades between the face-to-face and hybrid course formats were made using analysis of variance tests. A Mann-Whitney U test was used to determine if there were statistically significant differences in the way students in each course format answered the end of semester course and instructor evaluation survey. Of those that took the course, a majority [466 (98.3%)] was between the ages 18 and 24 years, within the Generation Z era. When comparing grades within this group, it was found students in the hybrid course received more A and B letter grades overall [223 (91%)] compared with the students of the same age range in the face-to-face course [198 (88.7%)]. Overall, seniors and juniors scored higher grades in both the hybrid and face-to-face course when compared with the sophomore and freshmen within the same class. No significant difference was found between the face-to-face and hybrid students’ responses to any of the 11 questions on the course and instructor evaluation survey. Results showed an overall high level of satisfaction (4.50) for both the face-to-face and hybrid format. 
Full-texts of the citations in the database are protected by copyright. If you would like to read the full articles, please check your academic library. For more information, read the FAQ.
[less]
2021, HortTechnology, 31(6), 709-714.
  |   Horticulture  |   Traditional, Blended/hybrid  |   228 Undergraduate
Comparing student performance in a graduate-level introductory Biostatistics course using an online versus a traditional in-person learning environment.
Hoffman, H. J., Elmi, A. F.
Our study compared the performance of students enrolled in a graduate-level introductory biostatistics course in an online versus a traditional in-person learning environment at a school of public … [more]
Our study compared the performance of students enrolled in a graduate-level introductory biostatistics course in an online versus a traditional in-person learning environment at a school of public health in the United States. We extracted data for students enrolled in the course online and in person from 2013 to 2018. We compared average quiz and final exam scores between students in the two learning environments adjusting for demographic characteristics and prior academic performance using linear mixed models. Data were available for 1461 (83.1%) students learning online and 298 (16.9%) students learning in person. After adjusting for sex, race/ethnicity, age, quantitative GRE score, undergraduate GPA, and math refresher score, we found quiz scores for students learning online were about 2.5% lower than those for students learning in person, on average, with a 95% confidence interval ranging from 4.9% lower to 0.02% higher. Differential performance was even closer to equality for the final exam where scores for students learning online were about 0.9% higher with a 95% confidence interval ranging from a 3.9% reduction to 5.8% improvement. These estimates suggest comparable student performance can be achieved in a graduate-level introductory biostatistics course among students learning online and in person. Supplementary materials for this article are available online. 
Full-texts of the citations in the database are protected by copyright. If you would like to read the full articles, please check your academic library. For more information, read the FAQ.
[less]
2021, Journal of Statistics and Data Science Education, 29(1), 105-114.
  |   Statistics  |   Traditional, Fully online  |   1,759 Graduate
Student performance in ground versus online sections of a Biological Science I college course
Romeo, P., Trevino, M., Posey, F., Romeo, S.
This study is a comparison of ground-based versus online student performance using a combination of common final examination scores and associated demographic data in a biological science college … [more]
This study is a comparison of ground-based versus online student performance using a combination of common final examination scores and associated demographic data in a biological science college course taught by a single instructor. Multivariate and standard statistical analyses are used to examine data from five semesters of ground and online instruction. Overall, students in ground course sections scored higher than those in online sections. Demographic comparisons of the pooled student populations from all five semesters show that there was a larger proportion of female than male students in both ground and online sections. Moreover, most students in ground sections were of traditional college age (18 to 24 years old), whereas online, the majority consisted of roughly equal numbers of college-age and post-college age students (older than 24 years old). High school–age students (younger than 18 years old) constituted the minority in both the ground and online sections, with their proportion being smaller in the latter. Regardless of gender and age group, ground students scored higher than online students. Additionally, the course pass rate was greater overall for ground students than for online students; this contrasted with the course withdrawal rate, which was greater for online students. 
Full-texts of the citations in the database are protected by copyright. If you would like to read the full articles, please check your academic library. For more information, read the FAQ.
[less]
2021, Journal of College Science Teaching, 51(2), 3-11.
  |   Biology  |   Traditional, Fully online  |   545 Undergraduate
Condensed and uploaded: Comparing student learning outcomes in a condensed, online summer class with outcomes in a full-semester, face-to-face class
Welch, J. R. , Roland, C. R.
With the significant cost of higher education and the uncertainty surrounding the COVID-19 pandemic, college students are increasingly seeking alternatives to traditional, face-to-face learning. However, concerns arise regarding … [more]
With the significant cost of higher education and the uncertainty surrounding the COVID-19 pandemic, college students are increasingly seeking alternatives to traditional, face-to-face learning. However, concerns arise regarding whether condensed, online classes offer a comparable experience to their full-length, face-to-face counterparts. Using a pretest/posttest design, this study compares the achievement of learning outcomes and student satisfaction between a course offered in a full-semester, face-to-face format and the same course taught by the same professor in a condensed, online format. Results indicate that, although online students in the condensed course achieved more of their anticipated learning outcomes, they were less satisfied with their instructor. We offer potential explanations, practical implications, and guidelines. 
Full-texts of the citations in the database are protected by copyright. If you would like to read the full articles, please check your academic library. For more information, read the FAQ.
[less]
2021, Summer Academe: A Journal of Higher Education, 14, 1-25.
  |   Communication Sciences  |   Traditional, Fully online  |   186 Undergraduate
Page: 1 2 3 4 … 29

About the database

This Ecampus Research Unit project is a searchable resource of academic studies of education efficacy across modalities. Filter by discipline or journal to find research in your subject area of interest. View overview or read the FAQ.

Subscribe to email alerts

* indicates required

Share

Feedback and suggestions

We're always looking for journal article suggestions. Please share your comments and questions.

Email feedback