Online Learning Efficacy Research Database

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Showing 1 - 10 of 225 citations
Comparing the efficacy of virtual and conventional methods in teaching practical pathology to medical students.
Abdollahi, A. , Salarvand, S., Saffar, H.
Electronic learning introduces a teaching device for deeper and more efficient learning. A study was conducted by the Pathology Department of Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran. … [more]
Electronic learning introduces a teaching device for deeper and more efficient learning. A study was conducted by the Pathology Department of Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran. The topic of practical pathology was selected earlier based on the curriculum. High-quality digital images of the slides were presented in the form of an e-file. The medical students were asked to register for participation in conventional or virtual groups. The first group underwent traditional education and members of the virtual group were given the website address to click into the website where the materials were uploaded. At the end of the semester, both groups were scientifically evaluated. The mean final pathology exam grade in the virtual group was higher than that of the control group; however, the difference between groups was not statistically significant (P=0.658). In conclusion, it was observed that in teaching practical pathology, virtual education may be as effective as conventional method. 
Full-texts of the citations in the database are protected by copyright. If you would like to read the full articles, please check your academic library. For more information, read the FAQ.
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2018, Iranian Journal of Pathology, 13(2), 108-112.
  |   Medicine  |   Traditional, Fully online  |   125 Undergraduate
Investigating the impact of blended learning on academic performance in a first semester college physics course.
Bazelais, P., Doleck, T.
This study investigates the impact of blended learning—which combines face-to-face classroom instruction with online-mediated instruction—in the context of Collège d’enseignement général et … [more]
This study investigates the impact of blended learning—which combines face-to-face classroom instruction with online-mediated instruction—in the context of Collège d’enseignement général et professionnel (CEGEP) pre-university science students. Although blended learning is a relatively recent addition to the college science classroom, studies have demonstrated that blended learning can create a more positive and active learning environment, and enhance both the quality of instruction and student learning outcomes in Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics (STEM) education. Today, blended learning approaches are increasingly adopted in classrooms across North American colleges and universities, yet blended learning has received limited attention in the context of CEGEP pre-university programs. The present study sought to address this gap by examining the effectiveness of instruction in the mechanics course in the physics pre-university program at an English CEGEP, comparing the blended learning approach and the traditional lecture-based instruction. The results suggest that the blended learning approach leads to more conceptual change, acquisition of more skills, and higher performance. The findings of this research provide valuable implications and encouragement for future implementations of blended learning in CEGEPs. 
Full-texts of the citations in the database are protected by copyright. If you would like to read the full articles, please check your academic library. For more information, read the FAQ.
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2018, Journal of Computers in Education, 1-28.
  |   Physics  |   Traditional, Blended/hybrid  |   71 Undergraduate
Blended learning and traditional learning: A comparative study of college mechanics courses.
Bazelais, P. , Doleck, T.
Research has suggested that learning approaches such as blended learning can enhance both the quality of instruction and student learning outcomes in STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, & Mathematics) education. … [more]
Research has suggested that learning approaches such as blended learning can enhance both the quality of instruction and student learning outcomes in STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, & Mathematics) education. However, little is known about how such instructional approaches affect learning outcomes in the context of Collège d’enseignement général et professionnel (CEGEP) pre-university science students. The present study focused on a college Mechanics course at a CEGEP that used blended learning, and compared the affects of the two learning modes (blended versus traditional) on student academic performance. Overall, the study revealed that students in the blended classroom (treatment) experienced more conceptual change and higher performance compared to the students in the traditional lecture-based class (control group). The findings offer support for the push to implement alternative approaches to instruction such as blended learning. Moreover, the study also improves understanding of the affects of approaches such as blended learning on understudied samples such as CEGEPs. 
Full-texts of the citations in the database are protected by copyright. If you would like to read the full articles, please check your academic library. For more information, read the FAQ.
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2018, Education and Information Technologies, 23(6), 2889-2900.
  |   Science  |   Traditional, Blended/hybrid  |   71 Undergraduate
An investigation of the relationship between grades and learning mode in an English composition course.
Bourdeau, D. T. , Griffith, K. V. , Griffith, J. C. , Griffith, J. R.
The education community has conducted studies on failure rates and withdrawal rates between learning modalities in the past, but few studies have evaluated grade distribution between learning modes … [more]
The education community has conducted studies on failure rates and withdrawal rates between learning modalities in the past, but few studies have evaluated grade distribution between learning modes or focused specifically on English Composition. Using 2,919 student grades from the 2015 – 2016 academic year for an English Composition course, researchers examined failure rates, grade distribution, and withdrawal rates between In-Person learning, Online learning, and Synchronous video learning modes. In this study, learning modes and failure rates were related. Synchronous video modes of instruction had higher failure rates than traditional In-Person classes. Synchronous video classroom students failed at a higher rate than online students. Grade distributions showed significant differences based on learning mode. In-Person students earned more Bs and fewer Cs, Ds, and Fs than Online and synchronous video classroom students. In-Person students also withdrew at a significantly lower rate than online students. With these findings, we suggest that finding the root cause and alleviating the differences in student performance across learning modes should be a high priority for the educational community. 
Full-texts of the citations in the database are protected by copyright. If you would like to read the full articles, please check your academic library. For more information, read the FAQ.
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2018, Journal of University Teaching & Learning Practice, 15 (2), 1-13.
  |   English  |   Traditional, Web-facilitated, Fully online  |   2,919 Undergraduate
Assessing student performance in hybrid versus web-facilitated personal health courses.
Cathorall, M. L., Xin, H., Blankson, F., Kempland, M., Schaefer, C.
This study aims to examine the effectiveness of web-facilitated and hybrid course delivery formats on student learning outcomes for four sections of an undergraduate Personal Health course at … [more]
This study aims to examine the effectiveness of web-facilitated and hybrid course delivery formats on student learning outcomes for four sections of an undergraduate Personal Health course at a public institution. This is a quasi-experimental study. Two sections were taught as hybrid classes and two sections were taught as web-facilitated classes. A total of 181 undergraduate students from across the university participated in the study. Student learning outcomes were measured by comparing quiz scores and final course grade. Instructor evaluation ratings were also compared. Results indicate that student-learning gains were similar regardless of delivery format. There were no significant differences in objective quiz scores or final grade between the delivery formats. The instructor mean evaluation score was significantly higher for the web-facilitated format. Although the students’ performance is comparable in both delivery formats students prefer web-facilitated courses with more face-to-face interactions with the instructor to hybrid courses. Examining student technological capabilities and motivation in web-facilitated and hybrid courses is necessary to improve evaluations. 
Full-texts of the citations in the database are protected by copyright. If you would like to read the full articles, please check your academic library. For more information, read the FAQ.
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2018, The Turkish Online Journal of Educational Technology, 17 (1), 11-16.
  |   Health  |   Web-facilitated, Blended/hybrid  |   181 Undergraduate
A comparison of online and traditional chemistry lecture and lab.
Faulconer, E. K. , Griffith, J. C., Wood, B. L., Archaryya, S., Roberts, D. L.
While the equivalence between online and traditional classrooms has been well researched, very little effort has been expended to do such comparisons for college level introductory chemistry. The … [more]
While the equivalence between online and traditional classrooms has been well researched, very little effort has been expended to do such comparisons for college level introductory chemistry. The existing literature has only one study that investigated chemistry lectures at an entire course level as opposed to particular course components such as individual topics or exams. Regarding lab courses, only one study is available and it involves moderating variables that are largely uncontrolled. In this work, we compared the student pass rates, withdrawal rates, and grade distributions between asynchronous online and traditional formats of an introductory chemistry lecture as well as its associated lab course. The study was based on the 823 university records available for the 2015–2016 academic year. Student pass and withdrawal rates between the two modes were quite similar and did not appear to be statistically significant. However, grade distributions for both the lecture and lab differed between the two learning modes, showing significant statistical associations. Online students were more likely to earn As in both lecture and lab while traditional in-person students were more likely to earn Cs or Ds. Further research should include replication of this study with a larger data set. Additionally, this study should be repeated in three to five years to determine if advances in course design, standardization and delivery platforms further reduce or eliminate differences between learning modes. Future studies should also use qualitative tools for a better understanding of why students fail or withdraw from courses. 
Full-texts of the citations in the database are protected by copyright. If you would like to read the full articles, please check your academic library. For more information, read the FAQ.
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2018, Chemistry Education Research and Practice, 19, 392-397.
  |   Chemistry  |   Traditional, Fully online  |   787 Undergraduate
A comparison of online, video synchronous, and traditional learning modes for an introductory undergraduate physics course.
Faulconer, E. K. , Griffith, J., Wood, B., Archaryya, S., Roberts, D.
While the equivalence between online and traditional classrooms has been well-researched, very little of this includes college-level introductory Physics. Only one study explored Physics at the whole-class level … [more]
While the equivalence between online and traditional classrooms has been well-researched, very little of this includes college-level introductory Physics. Only one study explored Physics at the whole-class level rather than specific course components such as a single lab or a homework platform. In this work, we compared the failure rate, grade distribution, and withdrawal rates in an introductory undergraduate Physics course across several learning modes including traditional face-to-face instruction, synchronous video instruction, and online classes. Statistically significant differences were found for student failure rates, grade distribution, and withdrawal rates but yielded small effect sizes. Post-hoc pair-wise test was run to determine differences between learning modes. Online students had a significantly lower failure rate than students who took the class via synchronous video classroom. While statistically significant differences were found for grade distributions, the pair-wise comparison yielded no statistically significance differences between learning modes when using the more conservative Bonferroni correction in post-hoc testing. Finally, in this study, student withdrawal rates were lowest for students who took the class in person (in-person classroom and synchronous video classroom) than online. Students that persist in an online introductory Physics class are more likely to achieve an A than in other modes. However, the withdrawal rate is higher from online Physics courses. Further research is warranted to better understand the reasons for higher withdrawal rates in online courses. Finding the root cause to help eliminate differences in student performance across learning modes should remain a high priority for education researchers and the education community as a whole. 
Full-texts of the citations in the database are protected by copyright. If you would like to read the full articles, please check your academic library. For more information, read the FAQ.
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2018, Journal of Science Education and Technology, 1-8.
  |   Physics  |   Traditional, Blended/hybrid, Fully online  |   1,964 Undergraduate
Assessing the impact of student effort and content interaction on learning for on-campus and online students.
Frederickson, J.
This research seeks to identify the student behaviors and course design features that foster student learning in a quantitative business course, and seeks to determine if successful teaching … [more]
This research seeks to identify the student behaviors and course design features that foster student learning in a quantitative business course, and seeks to determine if successful teaching and learning practices differ for on-campus and online learning environments. Hypotheses connecting measures of student effort, course structure, student engagement, student background characteristics and student learning are developed and tested. Course components intended to promote learner-content interaction were developed and incorporated. Individual assignments and interactive study modules were required in both the campus-based and online sections while student discussions were required for the online sections. The results suggest learner-content interaction has a positive impact on student learning while student effort, measured as amount of time spent studying, is either negatively related or not related to this outcome. Further analysis reveals that students’ perceptions of their performance ability mediate the relation between student effort and student learning. 
Full-texts of the citations in the database are protected by copyright. If you would like to read the full articles, please check your academic library. For more information, read the FAQ.
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2018, Global Journal of Business Pedagogy, 2(1), 47-64.
  |   Business  |   Traditional, Fully online  |   169 Undergraduate
Quantitative skills, critical thinking, and writing mechanics in blended versus face-to-face versions of a research methods and statistics course.
Goode, C. T. , Lamoreaux, M., Atchison, K. J. , Jeffress, E. C. , Lynch, H. L., Sheehan, E.
Hybrid or blended learning (BL) has been shown to be equivalent to or better than face-to-face (FTF) instruction in a broad variety of contexts. We randomly assigned students … [more]
Hybrid or blended learning (BL) has been shown to be equivalent to or better than face-to-face (FTF) instruction in a broad variety of contexts. We randomly assigned students to either 50/50 BL or 100% FTF versions of a research methods and statistics in psychology course. Students who took the BL version of the course scored significantly lower on measures of quantitative mastery of statistical concepts than those who took the FTF version; however, the size of this effect was quite small. We detected no significant difference between BL and FTF in the expression of critical thinking through writing or writing mechanics. The greatest difference in performance was among instructors regardless of instruction type. We discuss these results in the context of increasing online and BL instruction, particularly with regard to teaching psychological statistics, research methods, and critical thinking. 
Full-texts of the citations in the database are protected by copyright. If you would like to read the full articles, please check your academic library. For more information, read the FAQ.
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2018, Teaching of Psychology, 45, 124-131.
  |   Psychology  |   Traditional, Blended/hybrid  |   161 Undergraduate
College algebra - Online section versus traditional section.
Graham, V., Lazari, A.
The 21st century is considered to be the electronic age. This electronic age brings opportunities for new ways to deliver a lecture or a whole course in higher … [more]
The 21st century is considered to be the electronic age. This electronic age brings opportunities for new ways to deliver a lecture or a whole course in higher education. By offering courses online, universities are trying to reach the population of students that cannot attend classes on campus. Professors also utilize technology in a variety of ways to help them teach traditional classes. Valdosta State University (VSU) offers a variety of courses online including College Algebra (Math 1111). While we are trying to reach more students through the online courses, we should also examine the impact to student learning and success in College Algebra. In the fall 2016 and spring 2017 terms, VSU offered the first online sections of Math 1111 with 27 and 23 students, respectively. The course retention rate and the students’ performance on the departmental final exam for the treatment group, online section (OS), versus the control group, traditional section (TS) of 350 students, were compared. The OS had a statistically significant higher departmental final exam average, but there was no statistically significant difference in retention rate. 
Full-texts of the citations in the database are protected by copyright. If you would like to read the full articles, please check your academic library. For more information, read the FAQ.
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2018, Georgia Journal of Science, 76 (2), 1-6.
  |   Mathematics  |   Traditional, Fully online  |   400 Undergraduate
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This Ecampus Research Unit project is a searchable resource of academic studies of education efficacy across modalities. Filter by discipline or journal to find research in your subject area of interest. View overview or read the FAQ.

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