Online Learning Efficacy Research Database

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Showing 61 - 70 of 289 citations
Comparison of student performance and perceptions of a traditional lecture course versus an inverted classroom format for clinical microbiology.
Burnham, K. D., Mascenik, J.
Objective:Student satisfaction and student performance are of primary concern when classroom pedagogy is changed. We determine the equivalence of two teaching methodologies in a clinical microbiology course … [more]
Objective:
Student satisfaction and student performance are of primary concern when classroom pedagogy is changed. We determine the equivalence of two teaching methodologies in a clinical microbiology course using test scores as the measure of student performance.
Methods:
The two teaching methodologies examined were a traditional lecture-based method face-to-face (F2F) method and an inverted classroom method (ICM). Student perceptions of the ICM method were measured using a course survey in which students were asked to compare their experiences in the ICM class with experiences in a traditional F2F class. Classroom exams were administered in the same way in the traditional F2F lecture and ICM courses. Student test averages obtained in both pedagogies were compared for equivalence using an independent samples t-test. A six-question survey was developed to assess student perception of the ICM classroom compared to that for the traditional lecture-based classroom.
Results:
Test performance of students in the ICM was equivalent to that of students receiving traditional F2F lectures. Mean difference between test scores for the ICM and traditional F2F groups was 1.9 points (95% confidence interval [CI],4.0–0.14). Survey responses indicated that respondents feel positively about self-learning in ICM and prefer the flexibility provided by ICM.
Conclusion:
This study provides evidence that the ICM method of teaching clinical microbiology can replace the traditional F2F method without loss of student performance. Respondent perceptions of the inverted classroom were positive, with students favoring the flexibility. 
Full-texts of the citations in the database are protected by copyright. If you would like to read the full articles, please check your academic library. For more information, read the FAQ.
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2018, Journal of Chiropractic Education, 32(2), 90-97.
  |   Medicine  |   Traditional, Blended/hybrid  |   179 Graduate
Assessing student performance in hybrid versus web-facilitated personal health courses.
Cathorall, M. L., Xin, H., Blankson, F., Kempland, M., Schaefer, C.
This study aims to examine the effectiveness of web-facilitated and hybrid course delivery formats on student learning outcomes for four sections of an undergraduate Personal Health course at … [more]
This study aims to examine the effectiveness of web-facilitated and hybrid course delivery formats on student learning outcomes for four sections of an undergraduate Personal Health course at a public institution. This is a quasi-experimental study. Two sections were taught as hybrid classes and two sections were taught as web-facilitated classes. A total of 181 undergraduate students from across the university participated in the study. Student learning outcomes were measured by comparing quiz scores and final course grade. Instructor evaluation ratings were also compared. Results indicate that student-learning gains were similar regardless of delivery format. There were no significant differences in objective quiz scores or final grade between the delivery formats. The instructor mean evaluation score was significantly higher for the web-facilitated format. Although the students’ performance is comparable in both delivery formats students prefer web-facilitated courses with more face-to-face interactions with the instructor to hybrid courses. Examining student technological capabilities and motivation in web-facilitated and hybrid courses is necessary to improve evaluations. 
Full-texts of the citations in the database are protected by copyright. If you would like to read the full articles, please check your academic library. For more information, read the FAQ.
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2018, The Turkish Online Journal of Educational Technology, 17 (1), 11-16.
  |   Health  |   Web-facilitated, Blended/hybrid  |   181 Undergraduate
A comparison of online and traditional chemistry lecture and lab.
Faulconer, E. K. , Griffith, J. C., Wood, B. L., Archaryya, S., Roberts, D. L.
While the equivalence between online and traditional classrooms has been well researched, very little effort has been expended to do such comparisons for college level introductory chemistry. The … [more]
While the equivalence between online and traditional classrooms has been well researched, very little effort has been expended to do such comparisons for college level introductory chemistry. The existing literature has only one study that investigated chemistry lectures at an entire course level as opposed to particular course components such as individual topics or exams. Regarding lab courses, only one study is available and it involves moderating variables that are largely uncontrolled. In this work, we compared the student pass rates, withdrawal rates, and grade distributions between asynchronous online and traditional formats of an introductory chemistry lecture as well as its associated lab course. The study was based on the 823 university records available for the 2015–2016 academic year. Student pass and withdrawal rates between the two modes were quite similar and did not appear to be statistically significant. However, grade distributions for both the lecture and lab differed between the two learning modes, showing significant statistical associations. Online students were more likely to earn As in both lecture and lab while traditional in-person students were more likely to earn Cs or Ds. Further research should include replication of this study with a larger data set. Additionally, this study should be repeated in three to five years to determine if advances in course design, standardization and delivery platforms further reduce or eliminate differences between learning modes. Future studies should also use qualitative tools for a better understanding of why students fail or withdraw from courses. 
Full-texts of the citations in the database are protected by copyright. If you would like to read the full articles, please check your academic library. For more information, read the FAQ.
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2018, Chemistry Education Research and Practice, 19, 392-397.
  |   Chemistry  |   Traditional, Fully online  |   787 Undergraduate
A comparison of online, video synchronous, and traditional learning modes for an introductory undergraduate physics course.
Faulconer, E. K. , Griffith, J., Wood, B., Archaryya, S., Roberts, D.
While the equivalence between online and traditional classrooms has been well-researched, very little of this includes college-level introductory Physics. Only one study explored Physics at the whole-class level … [more]
While the equivalence between online and traditional classrooms has been well-researched, very little of this includes college-level introductory Physics. Only one study explored Physics at the whole-class level rather than specific course components such as a single lab or a homework platform. In this work, we compared the failure rate, grade distribution, and withdrawal rates in an introductory undergraduate Physics course across several learning modes including traditional face-to-face instruction, synchronous video instruction, and online classes. Statistically significant differences were found for student failure rates, grade distribution, and withdrawal rates but yielded small effect sizes. Post-hoc pair-wise test was run to determine differences between learning modes. Online students had a significantly lower failure rate than students who took the class via synchronous video classroom. While statistically significant differences were found for grade distributions, the pair-wise comparison yielded no statistically significance differences between learning modes when using the more conservative Bonferroni correction in post-hoc testing. Finally, in this study, student withdrawal rates were lowest for students who took the class in person (in-person classroom and synchronous video classroom) than online. Students that persist in an online introductory Physics class are more likely to achieve an A than in other modes. However, the withdrawal rate is higher from online Physics courses. Further research is warranted to better understand the reasons for higher withdrawal rates in online courses. Finding the root cause to help eliminate differences in student performance across learning modes should remain a high priority for education researchers and the education community as a whole. 
Full-texts of the citations in the database are protected by copyright. If you would like to read the full articles, please check your academic library. For more information, read the FAQ.
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2018, Journal of Science Education and Technology, 1-8.
  |   Physics  |   Traditional, Blended/hybrid, Fully online  |   1,964 Undergraduate
Randomized controlled trials of U-Pace instruction: Outcomes in two gateway courses.
Fleming, R., Kienzler, S., Stoiber, L. , Fleming, R. R. , Pedrick, L. E. , Reddy, D. M.
Less than optimal student success in gateway courses figures prominently in college noncompletion. Past findings suggest that U-Pace instruction holds promise for increasing student success. However, all published … [more]
Less than optimal student success in gateway courses figures prominently in college noncompletion. Past findings suggest that U-Pace instruction holds promise for increasing student success. However, all published studies of U-Pace instruction were conducted in the gateway course context of introductory psychology. The objective of this research was to rigorously evaluate the efficacy of U-Pace instruction in introductory sociology and introductory political science for students at-risk for college noncompletion and students not at-risk. The findings from both randomized controlled trials indicate that regardless of risk status, U-Pace students outperformed their conventionally taught face-to-face counterparts earning a greater percentage of final grades of A or B and higher scores on a proctored cumulative assessment of learning, independent of final grades. The results not only confirm previous findings of greater academic success and greater learning associated with U-Pace instruction but also clearly demonstrate that U-Pace instruction produces greater learning and greater academic success. Further, the findings of this research reveal that these student outcomes generalize across courses in two disciplines for both students at-risk for college noncompletion and students not at-risk, providing strong support for the efficacy of U-Pace instruction. 
Full-texts of the citations in the database are protected by copyright. If you would like to read the full articles, please check your academic library. For more information, read the FAQ.
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2018, Journal of Computer Assisted Learning, 34(6), 799-806.
  |   Multiple  |   Traditional, Fully online  |   884 Undergraduate
Assessing the impact of student effort and content interaction on learning for on-campus and online students.
Frederickson, J.
This research seeks to identify the student behaviors and course design features that foster student learning in a quantitative business course, and seeks to determine if successful teaching … [more]
This research seeks to identify the student behaviors and course design features that foster student learning in a quantitative business course, and seeks to determine if successful teaching and learning practices differ for on-campus and online learning environments. Hypotheses connecting measures of student effort, course structure, student engagement, student background characteristics and student learning are developed and tested. Course components intended to promote learner-content interaction were developed and incorporated. Individual assignments and interactive study modules were required in both the campus-based and online sections while student discussions were required for the online sections. The results suggest learner-content interaction has a positive impact on student learning while student effort, measured as amount of time spent studying, is either negatively related or not related to this outcome. Further analysis reveals that students’ perceptions of their performance ability mediate the relation between student effort and student learning. 
Full-texts of the citations in the database are protected by copyright. If you would like to read the full articles, please check your academic library. For more information, read the FAQ.
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2018, Global Journal of Business Pedagogy, 2(1), 47-64.
  |   Business  |   Traditional, Fully online  |   169 Undergraduate
Quantitative skills, critical thinking, and writing mechanics in blended versus face-to-face versions of a research methods and statistics course.
Goode, C. T. , Lamoreaux, M., Atchison, K. J. , Jeffress, E. C. , Lynch, H. L., Sheehan, E.
Hybrid or blended learning (BL) has been shown to be equivalent to or better than face-to-face (FTF) instruction in a broad variety of contexts. We randomly assigned students … [more]
Hybrid or blended learning (BL) has been shown to be equivalent to or better than face-to-face (FTF) instruction in a broad variety of contexts. We randomly assigned students to either 50/50 BL or 100% FTF versions of a research methods and statistics in psychology course. Students who took the BL version of the course scored significantly lower on measures of quantitative mastery of statistical concepts than those who took the FTF version; however, the size of this effect was quite small. We detected no significant difference between BL and FTF in the expression of critical thinking through writing or writing mechanics. The greatest difference in performance was among instructors regardless of instruction type. We discuss these results in the context of increasing online and BL instruction, particularly with regard to teaching psychological statistics, research methods, and critical thinking. 
Full-texts of the citations in the database are protected by copyright. If you would like to read the full articles, please check your academic library. For more information, read the FAQ.
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2018, Teaching of Psychology, 45, 124-131.
  |   Psychology  |   Traditional, Blended/hybrid  |   161 Undergraduate
College algebra - Online section versus traditional section.
Graham, V., Lazari, A.
The 21st century is considered to be the electronic age. This electronic age brings opportunities for new ways to deliver a lecture or a whole course in higher … [more]
The 21st century is considered to be the electronic age. This electronic age brings opportunities for new ways to deliver a lecture or a whole course in higher education. By offering courses online, universities are trying to reach the population of students that cannot attend classes on campus. Professors also utilize technology in a variety of ways to help them teach traditional classes. Valdosta State University (VSU) offers a variety of courses online including College Algebra (Math 1111). While we are trying to reach more students through the online courses, we should also examine the impact to student learning and success in College Algebra. In the fall 2016 and spring 2017 terms, VSU offered the first online sections of Math 1111 with 27 and 23 students, respectively. The course retention rate and the students’ performance on the departmental final exam for the treatment group, online section (OS), versus the control group, traditional section (TS) of 350 students, were compared. The OS had a statistically significant higher departmental final exam average, but there was no statistically significant difference in retention rate. 
Full-texts of the citations in the database are protected by copyright. If you would like to read the full articles, please check your academic library. For more information, read the FAQ.
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2018, Georgia Journal of Science, 76 (2), 1-6.
  |   Mathematics  |   Traditional, Fully online  |   400 Undergraduate
The effect of blended learning on developing Saudi English majors' writing skills.
Hamouda, A.
Blended learning seems to be an emerging trend in education and has caught the interest of many educators and researchers as a new approach to encourage students in … [more]
Blended learning seems to be an emerging trend in education and has caught the interest of many educators and researchers as a new approach to encourage students in their learning process. Though blended learning has proven its success and efficiency in teaching and learning of English writing skills in many ESL and EFL contexts, no attempts had been made to investigate its effectiveness in teaching English writing skills in K.S.A. To fill in this gab, the current study attempts to examine the impact of blended learning approach on improving Saudi EFL students’ English essay writing. Moreover, it examines Saudi students’ perceptiveness toward implementing blended learning approach to develop English essay writing. Sixty participants were selected out of sixty eight English majors based on their scores on a piloted proficiency test. They were then randomly divided into two equal groups undergoing control and experimental conditions. The experimental group was taught through the use of blended learning approach whereas the control group was taught through traditional lecture method. To achieve the study aims, the researcher adopted a mixed method research design so as to collect qualitative and quantitative data. Data collection instruments were pre and post writing essays tests, questionnaire, and interviews. Teaching experiment was conducted for ten weeks in March-April 2017. The researcher used the following statistical methods to reach the results: (Mean, Standard Deviation, and T-Test). The results of the independent-samples t-tests showed that participants of the blended learning group significantly outperformed the control group in their writing performance. The study findings also revealed that there were statistically significant differences between the scores of the paired experimental group in the pre and post achievement test in favour of the post-test. This improvement was ascribed to the use of blended learning approach in teaching essay writing. Moreover, the analysis of the data obtained from the questionnaires and interviews indicated that students in the experimental group had positive perspectives towards the use of blended learning approach in teaching English essay writing. Finally, the findings of the study hold a number of pedagogical implications for EFL learners, language teachers, material developers, and those interested in essay writing. 
Full-texts of the citations in the database are protected by copyright. If you would like to read the full articles, please check your academic library. For more information, read the FAQ.
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2018, International Journal of English and Education, 7, 40-84.
  |   English Language Writing  |   Traditional, Blended/hybrid  |   60 Undergraduate
Effects of implementing a hybrid wet lab and online module lab curriculum into a general chemistry course: Impacts on student performance and engagement with the chemistry triplet.
Irby, S. M. , Borda, E. J. , Haupt, J.
Here, we describe the implementation a hybrid general chemistry teaching laboratory curriculum that replaces a portion of a course’s traditional “wet lab” experiences with online virtual lab … [more]
Here, we describe the implementation a hybrid general chemistry teaching laboratory curriculum that replaces a portion of a course’s traditional “wet lab” experiences with online virtual lab modules. These modules intentionally utilize representations on all three levels of the chemistry triplet - macroscopic, submicroscopic, and symbolic. The implementation of this curriculum allowed an opportunity to evaluate this new course structure. First, student performance was assessed based on pre- and post-assessments. Second, dialogue from students working through the traditional and module versions of one lab was analyzed for how each format encouraged students to engage with the chemistry triplet. Data suggest both formats led to positive learning gains, but the differences between formats were not statistically significant. However, there was a significant difference in student engagement with the chemistry triplet, with module students showing a higher overall amount of triplet-related dialogue and more continuous dialogue segments connecting multiple levels of the triplet. 
Full-texts of the citations in the database are protected by copyright. If you would like to read the full articles, please check your academic library. For more information, read the FAQ.
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2018, Journal of Chemical Education, 95, 224-232.
  |   Chemistry  |   Traditional, Blended/hybrid  |   67 Undergraduate
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This Ecampus Research Unit project is a searchable resource of academic studies of education efficacy across modalities. Filter by discipline or journal to find research in your subject area of interest. View overview or read the FAQ.

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