Online Learning Efficacy Research Database

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Showing 1 - 10 of 11 citations  |  Clear filters
Effects of blended learning instructional strategy on social science achievement of senior secondary students.
Parhi, R. K., Parhi, H.
Information and technology has now become the key to academic success of students at various levels of education. Blended Learning strategy is viewed as resourceful and innovative instructional … [more]
Information and technology has now become the key to academic success of students at various levels of education. Blended Learning strategy is viewed as resourceful and innovative instructional strategy which can elegantly integrate traditional instructional convention method and e-learning method. The purpose of the research work was to study the effectiveness of blended learning instructional strategy on social science achievement of Class-XI students and to observe the difference between the students taught by blended learning strategy and face-to-face traditional instructional strategy. Experimental method was adopted for the present study. The researcher has employed the tools, viz. achievement test in economics and blended learning instructional package for this experimental study. The findings of the study reveal that the blended learning strategy is more effective than the face-to-face traditional instructional method for the academic achievement. The study found that blended learning strategy has improved the academic achievement of students in posttest. 
Full-texts of the citations in the database are protected by copyright. If you would like to read the full articles, please check your academic library. For more information, read the FAQ.
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2020, Journal of Xi'an University of Architecture & Technology, 12, 1119-1128.
  |   Economics  |   Traditional, Blended/hybrid  |   53 Undergraduate
Online vs. face-to-face: A comparison of student outcomes with random assignment.
Arias, J. J. , Swinton, J., Anderson, K.
The following study contrasts the efficacy of online delivery relative to face-to-face delivery using an enrolment protocol that largely eliminates self-selection bias. Only a few previous studies even … [more]
The following study contrasts the efficacy of online delivery relative to face-to-face delivery using an enrolment protocol that largely eliminates self-selection bias. Only a few previous studies even attempt to control for sample selection. The study utilizes random assignment of the registrants of a Principles of Macroeconomics class into two alternative venues: online and face-to-face. The same professor taught both sections with the same course objectives and exams. Both the change in student scores from the pre-test to the post-test and the student’s exam average are model led as a function of the course environment, the student’s SAT math score (or ACT equivalent), the student’s GPA prior to taking the course, the student’s gender and the student’s overall credit hours prior to taking the course. The pre- and post-test had both standardized and instructor-specific questions. Students in the face-to-face section have statistically significantly higher exam scores and statistically significantly greater improvement on the post-test instructor questions. There is no statistical difference in the improvement on the post-test overall nor in the improvement in the post-test standardized questions. These mixed results suggest that both course objectives and the mechanism used to assess the relative effectiveness of the two modes of education may play an important part in determining the relative effectiveness of alternative delivery methods. 
Full-texts of the citations in the database are protected by copyright. If you would like to read the full articles, please check your academic library. For more information, read the FAQ.
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2018, E-Journal of Business Education & Scholarship of Teaching, 12(2), 1-23.
  |   Economics  |   Traditional, Fully online  |   32 Undergraduate
Knowledge retention, student learning, and blended course work: Evidence from principles of economics courses.
Cosgrove, S. B., Olitsky, N. H.
Over the past decade, there has been a large increase in the number of colleges and universities that offer fully online courses and blended courses (courses with a … [more]
Over the past decade, there has been a large increase in the number of colleges and universities that offer fully online courses and blended courses (courses with a face-to-face component and with an online component). The number of students enrolling in these courses has also increased. These courses are less costly for universities to offer and provide students with more flexibility than traditional classes. This study examines the relationship between online learning and knowledge retention in introductory economics courses. Student assessment data are matched to transcript and demographic information to control for individual student attributes. Using a differences-in-differences matching estimator, we determine the effect online coursework has on knowledge retention by comparing performance on the assessment. Results suggest that while there is no significant difference in student learning, students in more traditional, technology-free courses retain the material better than students. 
Full-texts of the citations in the database are protected by copyright. If you would like to read the full articles, please check your academic library. For more information, read the FAQ.
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2015, Southern Economic Journal, 82(2), 556-579.
  |   Economics  |   Blended/hybrid, Fully online  |   429 Undergraduate
Testing the effect of hybrid lecture delivery on learning outcomes.
Harmon, O. R., Alpert, W. T., Lambrinos, J.
Empirical studies have yielded mixed results with regard to the issue of whether the online and traditional modalities have equivalent effects on learning outcomes for courses taught at … [more]
Empirical studies have yielded mixed results with regard to the issue of whether the online and traditional modalities have equivalent effects on learning outcomes for courses taught at the Master of Business Administration (MBA) level. A majority of these empirical studies support the conclusion of no significant difference between the modalities. However, only a small percentage of these studies address the issue of self-selection bias, and fewer study the hybrid format. This paper reports on a study that contributes to the existing MBA literature by employing a research design that appropriately handles self-selection bias in the context of a hybrid course. The key finding of the study is that the effect of the online format on learning outcomes does not handicap outcomes relative to the traditional format. 
Full-texts of the citations in the database are protected by copyright. If you would like to read the full articles, please check your academic library. For more information, read the FAQ.
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2014, Journal of Online Learning and Teaching, 10(1), 112.
  |   Economics  |   Traditional, Blended/hybrid  |   1,711 Graduate
The effect of blended courses on student learning: Evidence from introductory economics courses.
Olitsky, N. H., Cosgrove, S. B.
This study examines the effect of blended coursework on student learning outcomes in introductory economics courses. The effect of blending on learning is determined by comparing scores on … [more]
This study examines the effect of blended coursework on student learning outcomes in introductory economics courses. The effect of blending on learning is determined by comparing scores on quizzes and exams between students in a blended course (the treatment) and students in a traditional face-to-face course (the control). This study accounts for the potential bias due to non-random selection into treatment by using propensity score matching. The results indicate no significant effects of blending on student learning. 
Full-texts of the citations in the database are protected by copyright. If you would like to read the full articles, please check your academic library. For more information, read the FAQ.
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2014, International Review of Economics Education, 15, 17-31.
  |   Economics  |   Blended/hybrid  |   318 Undergraduate
Student performance in a principle of microeconomics course under hybrid and face-to-face delivery.
Verhoeven, P., Rudchenko, T.
Designing a hybrid course entails the challenge of choosing learning activities for each of the face-to-face and online environments--and sequencing and coordinating the activities across the two environments--to … [more]
Designing a hybrid course entails the challenge of choosing learning activities for each of the face-to-face and online environments--and sequencing and coordinating the activities across the two environments--to promote student attainment of the course’s learning objectives. This paper presents a study comparing student performance in an undergraduate Principles of Microeconomics course taught by the same instructor under hybrid (n = 51) and face-to-face (n = 24) delivery. The percentage of hybrid students completing the course (71%) was not significantly different (chi-square = .61, p = .433) than that (79%) of the face-to-face students. A regression analysis controlling for student GPA indicated that, for students completing the course, the composite test score was, on average, an estimated 4.8 percentage points lower (p = .025, one-tailed) under hybrid delivery than under face-to-face delivery. Student GPA had a strong positive ceteris paribus impact (p = .000, one-tailed) on the composite test score. The finding of a lower level of student learning under hybrid relative to face-to-face delivery is attributed to inattentiveness to pedagogical principles in designing the hybrid course. The study serves as a caution to colleges and universities initiating or expanding their hybrid course offerings in the absence of faculty training or quality control checks. The paper closes with suggestions for further research. 
Full-texts of the citations in the database are protected by copyright. If you would like to read the full articles, please check your academic library. For more information, read the FAQ.
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2013, American Journal of Educational Research, 1(10), 413-418.
  |   Economics  |   Traditional, Blended/hybrid  |   75 Undergraduate
Applying the scholarship of teaching and learning: student perceptions, behaviours and success online and face-to-face.
Horspool, A. , Lange, C.
This study compares student perceptions, learning behaviours and success in online and face-to-face versions of a Principles of Microeconomics course. It follows a Scholarship of Teaching and Learning ( … [more]
This study compares student perceptions, learning behaviours and success in online and face-to-face versions of a Principles of Microeconomics course. It follows a Scholarship of Teaching and Learning (SoTL) approach by using a cycle of empirical analysis, reflection and action to improve the learning experience for students. The online course design involves 58 interactive narrated online modules, interactive online quizzes and biweekly online meetings with the instructor via video and voice-over-IP technology. Findings indicate that schedule flexibility motivates students to choose the online course format. Students in both learning environments felt they had high-quality communication with the instructor, while online students indicated limited peer-to-peer communication. Online students report studying more at home than face-to-face students, but not enough to compensate for the time face-to-face students spend in class. Reflecting on the findings, the authors suggest actions to improve the online course experience. 
Full-texts of the citations in the database are protected by copyright. If you would like to read the full articles, please check your academic library. For more information, read the FAQ.
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2012, Assessment and Evaluation in Higher Education, 37(1), 73-88.
  |   Economics  |   Traditional, Fully online  |   183 Undergraduate
Teaching principles of economics: Internet vs. traditional classroom instruction.
Bennett, D. S., Padgham, G. L., McCarty, C. S., Carter, M. S.
Although still in its infancy, the use of the internet as a means to teach college courses, including economics, is growing. Previous research concerning the level of student … [more]
Although still in its infancy, the use of the internet as a means to teach college courses, including economics, is growing. Previous research concerning the level of student learning in economics courses via the internet versus a traditional classroom has been scant and inconclusive. This paper explores the factors that influence student performance in both principles of macroeconomics and principles of microeconomics and compares student achievement in courses taken in traditional classroom settings with those done via the internet. We provide a brief summary of the relevant literature, a description and statistical analysis of our data, and a discussion of our findings. Future ideas for research are noted. 
Full-texts of the citations in the database are protected by copyright. If you would like to read the full articles, please check your academic library. For more information, read the FAQ.
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2007, Journal of Economics and Economic Education Research, 8(1), 21-31.
Economics  |   Traditional, Fully online  |   498 Undergraduate
“No significant distance” between face-to-face and online instruction: Evidence from principles of economics.
Coates, D., Humphreys, B. R., Kane, J., Vachris, M. A.
This paper describes an experiment focused on measuring and explaining differences in students learning between online and face-to-face modes of instruction in college level principles of economics courses. … [more]
This paper describes an experiment focused on measuring and explaining differences in students learning between online and face-to-face modes of instruction in college level principles of economics courses. Our results indicate that students in face-to-face sections scored better on the Test of Understanding College Economics (TUCE) than students in online sections. We find that failure to account for the self-selection of students into online or face-to-face sections biases toward zero the differential in TUCE scores between online and face-to-face students. Online students score a statistically significant 3–6 fewer correct answers, out of 33 questions, than face-to-face students in the selection-corrected model. However, an endogenous switching model finds that students who select into the online classes perform better than they would, all other things constant, in a face-to-face class. Other results suggest caution in using the web to teach underclassmen. 
Full-texts of the citations in the database are protected by copyright. If you would like to read the full articles, please check your academic library. For more information, read the FAQ.
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2004, Economics of Education Review, 23(5), 533-546.
  |   Economics  |   Traditional, Web-facilitated, Fully online  |   126 Undergraduate
Can web courses replace the classroom in principles of microeconomics?
Brown, B. W., Liedholm, C. E.
The proliferation of economics courses offered partly or completely online (Arnold Katz and William E. Becker, 1999) raises important questions about the effects of the new technologies on … [more]
The proliferation of economics courses offered partly or completely online (Arnold Katz and William E. Becker, 1999) raises important questions about the effects of the new technologies on student learning. Do students enrolled in online courses learn more or less than students taught face-to-face? Can we identify any student characteristics, such as gender, race, ACT scores, or grade averages, that are associated with better outcomes in one technology or another? How would the online (or face-to-face) students fare if they had taken the course using the alternative technology? This paper addresses these questions using student data from our Principles of Microeconomics courses at Michigan State University. 
Full-texts of the citations in the database are protected by copyright. If you would like to read the full articles, please check your academic library. For more information, read the FAQ.
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2002, The American Economic Review, 92(2), 444-448.
  |   Economics  |   Traditional, Blended/hybrid, Fully online  |   710 Undergraduate
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This Ecampus Research Unit project is a searchable resource of academic studies of education efficacy across modalities. Filter by discipline or journal to find research in your subject area of interest. View overview or read the FAQ.

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