Online Learning Efficacy Research Database

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Showing 1 - 6 of 6 citations  |  Clear filters
The costs of online learning: Examining differences in motivation and academic outcomes in online and face-to-face community college developmental mathematics courses
Francis, M. K., Wormington, S. V., Hulleman, C.
Although online courses are becoming increasingly popular in higher education, evidence is inconclusive regarding whether online students are likely to be as academically successful and motivated as students … [more]
Although online courses are becoming increasingly popular in higher education, evidence is inconclusive regarding whether online students are likely to be as academically successful and motivated as students in face-to-face courses. In this study, we documented online and face-to-face students’ academic motivation and outcomes in community college mathematics courses, and whether differences might vary based on student characteristics (i.e., gender, underrepresented ethnic/racial minority status, first-generation college status, and adult learner status). Over 2,400 developmental mathematics students reported on their math motivation at the beginning (Week 1) and middle (Weeks 3, 5) of the semester. Findings indicated that online students received lower grades and were less likely to pass from their courses than face-to-face students, with online adult learners receiving particularly low final course grades and pass rates. In contrast, online and face-to-face students did not differ on incoming motivation, with subgroup analyses suggesting largely similar patterns of motivation across student groups. Together, findings suggest that online and faceto-face students may differ overall in academic outcomes but not in their motivation or differentially based on student characteristics. Small but significant differences on academic outcomes across modalities (Cohen’s ds = 0.17–0.28) have implications for community college students’ success in online learning environments, particularly for adult learners who are most likely to be faced with competing demands. 
Full-texts of the citations in the database are protected by copyright. If you would like to read the full articles, please check your academic library. For more information, read the FAQ.
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2019, Frontiers in Psychology, 10, 1-12.
  |   Mathematics  |   Traditional, Fully online  |   2,411 Undergraduate
College algebra - Online section versus traditional section.
Graham, V., Lazari, A.
The 21st century is considered to be the electronic age. This electronic age brings opportunities for new ways to deliver a lecture or a whole course in higher … [more]
The 21st century is considered to be the electronic age. This electronic age brings opportunities for new ways to deliver a lecture or a whole course in higher education. By offering courses online, universities are trying to reach the population of students that cannot attend classes on campus. Professors also utilize technology in a variety of ways to help them teach traditional classes. Valdosta State University (VSU) offers a variety of courses online including College Algebra (Math 1111). While we are trying to reach more students through the online courses, we should also examine the impact to student learning and success in College Algebra. In the fall 2016 and spring 2017 terms, VSU offered the first online sections of Math 1111 with 27 and 23 students, respectively. The course retention rate and the students’ performance on the departmental final exam for the treatment group, online section (OS), versus the control group, traditional section (TS) of 350 students, were compared. The OS had a statistically significant higher departmental final exam average, but there was no statistically significant difference in retention rate. 
Full-texts of the citations in the database are protected by copyright. If you would like to read the full articles, please check your academic library. For more information, read the FAQ.
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2018, Georgia Journal of Science, 76 (2), 1-6.
  |   Mathematics  |   Traditional, Fully online  |   400 Undergraduate
The effects of age and gender on student achievement in face-to-face and online college algebra classes.
Amro, H. J., Mundy, M.A., Kupczynski, L.
Demand for online learning has increased in recent years due to the convenience of course delivery. However, some students appear to have difficulties with online education resulting in … [more]
Demand for online learning has increased in recent years due to the convenience of course delivery. However, some students appear to have difficulties with online education resulting in lack of completion. The study utilized a quantitative approach with archival data. The factors of achievement and demographics were compared for face-to-face and online students. Multiple regressions and ANCOVA were performed to analyze the data while controlling age and gender to reveal any significant differences between the two groups. The sample and population for this study were predominantly Hispanic students. Multiple regression findings indicated that age and gender were predictors of student achievement in face-to-face college algebra courses at a college in south Texas. In the equivalent college algebra online courses, neither Age nor Gender impacted students’ grade. ANCOVA showed that the average grade of face-to-face students was higher than that of online students. 
Full-texts of the citations in the database are protected by copyright. If you would like to read the full articles, please check your academic library. For more information, read the FAQ.
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2015, Research In Higher Education, 27, 1.
  |   Mathematics  |   Traditional, Fully online  |   22,219 Undergraduate
Are students studying in the online mode faring as well as students studying in the face-to-face mode? Has equivalence in learning been achieved?
Fonolahi, A. V., Jokhan, A.
With the shift in pedagogy from learning in the traditional classroom setting (face-to-face mode) to online learning, it is important to find out how students are faring in … [more]
With the shift in pedagogy from learning in the traditional classroom setting (face-to-face mode) to online learning, it is important to find out how students are faring in the online mode and if equivalence in learning is achieved in the two modes. To answer these questions, the course results of students studying a first year undergraduate mathematics course in the two different modes at The University of the South Pacific were compared. The study revealed that there was no statistical significant difference in the pass rates of the students studying in the two modes but the students studying in the online mode had a significantly higher attrition rate. From the results, it was also discovered that students studying via the online mode achieved higher coursework marks but lower exam marks compared to students studying via the face to-face mode. Yet the students' total marks in the two modes were similar, which led to the conclusion that students studying in the online mode are faring just as well as students studying in the face-to-face mode. It was evident that equivalent learning was occurring in the two modes albeit in different ways. The coursework assessments methods in the two modes were also compared. 
Full-texts of the citations in the database are protected by copyright. If you would like to read the full articles, please check your academic library. For more information, read the FAQ.
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2014, Journal of Online Learning and Teaching, 10(4), 598.
  |   Mathematics  |   Traditional, Fully online  |   1,726 Undergraduate
Learning equity between online and on-site mathematics courses.
Jones, S. J., Long, V. M.
This paper reports on a research study that focused on equity in learning as reflected in the final grades of online and on-site students from the same post-secondary … [more]
This paper reports on a research study that focused on equity in learning as reflected in the final grades of online and on-site students from the same post-secondary mathematics course taught repeatedly over 10 semesters from Fall 2005 through Spring 2011. On-site students attended regular class sessions, while online students only attended an orientation session and a final exam. Mean final course grades for all online and on-site students were compared statistically to see if there was a significant difference in learning. The findings revealed significant differences in online and on-site students' final grades, in favor of on-site student achievement. Statistical tests were also conducted on a number of subsets drawn from all students' final grades in order to search for any underlying nuances that might exist. When the first three semesters of data were removed from the dataset, no significant difference was found between the mean scores for on-site and online students for the seven most recent semesters. It is reasonable to conclude that it is possible for students in both on-site and online sections of a course to achieve equity in mathematics learning as measured by final course grades. 
Full-texts of the citations in the database are protected by copyright. If you would like to read the full articles, please check your academic library. For more information, read the FAQ.
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2013, Journal of Online Learning and Teaching, 9(1), 1.
  |   Mathematics  |   Traditional, Fully online  |   445 Undergraduate
Comparing student success between developmental math courses offered online, blended, and face-to-face.
Ashby, J., Sadera, W. A., McNary, S. W.
Community colleges are increasing their enrollment faster than four-year universities and have also had the highest growth rate in online learning enrollments in higher education. This increase in … [more]
Community colleges are increasing their enrollment faster than four-year universities and have also had the highest growth rate in online learning enrollments in higher education. This increase in community college enrollment and specifically in online and developmental courses, leads to a need for research with this population; sadly, very little research focuses on online students in community colleges. The purpose of this paper is to present a research study which compared student success in a Developmental Math course offered in three different learning environments (online, blended, and face-to-face). Using quantitative instruments, data from 167 participants was collected including, demographic information, unit test grades and standardized Intermediate Algebra Competency Exam scores. Results of a one way ANOVA showed that there were significant differences between learning environments with the students in the blended courses having the least success. Additional analysis was done to address issues of attrition since attrition rates are high for community college students and online students. Data analysis with the attrition adjusted sample showed that the face-to-face students performed most poorly. The findings of this study contradict the current research findings of no significant difference in success based on learning environment. 
Full-texts of the citations in the database are protected by copyright. If you would like to read the full articles, please check your academic library. For more information, read the FAQ.
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2011, Journal of Interactive Online Learning, 10(3).
  |   Mathematics  |   Traditional, Blended/hybrid, Fully online  |   167 Undergraduate
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This Ecampus Research Unit project is a searchable resource of academic studies of education efficacy across modalities. Filter by discipline or journal to find research in your subject area of interest. View overview or read the FAQ.

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