Online Learning Efficacy Research Database

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Showing 1 - 10 of 15 citations  |  Clear filters
Striking a balance in school psychology training: A comparison of blended delivery formats and student outcomes.
Ball, C., McNeany, J., Hopple, A.
As higher education faces declines in federal funding and enrollment, academic programs are increasingly tasked with examining their recruitment and admissions practices, mode and flexibility of delivery, and … [more]
As higher education faces declines in federal funding and enrollment, academic programs are increasingly tasked with examining their recruitment and admissions practices, mode and flexibility of delivery, and student retention. In particular, some programs may encounter pressure to introduce part-time or distance learning options into traditionally full-time, on-campus programs. Concurrently, the field of school psychology suffers from a critical nationwide shortage, which further strengthens the impetus for programs to attract and successfully prepare graduate students in greater numbers. In this article, we examine various metrics of student success from one graduate program that concurrently offered program curriculum in two blended delivery formats. In particular, we examine (a) enrollments; (b) timely remediation; (c) retention and degree completion; and (d) intern performance and post-graduation employment across the two delivery formats. We discuss potential benefits and challenges of distance education in school psychology training and offer recommendations for balancing quality and accessibility in curriculum delivery. 
Full-texts of the citations in the database are protected by copyright. If you would like to read the full articles, please check your academic library. For more information, read the FAQ.
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2020, Contemporary School Psychology, Contemporary School Psychology.
  |   Psychology  |   Traditional, Blended/hybrid, Fully online  |   39 Graduate
Cultural competence shifts in multicultural psychology: Online versus face-to face.
de la Caridad Alvarez, M., Domenech Rodriguez, M. M.
An undergraduate multicultural psychology class that aimed to promote shifts in the cultural competence domains of self-awareness, knowledge, and skills was offered online and face-to-face. Upon comparison of … [more]
An undergraduate multicultural psychology class that aimed to promote shifts in the cultural competence domains of self-awareness, knowledge, and skills was offered online and face-to-face. Upon comparison of pre- and post-self-report measures for 155 students across the two modalities, we found significant between-group differences for gender, Wilks’ λ = .821, F(6, 146) = 5.291, p < .001, η2p = .179, with women reflecting more favorable scores than men. Within groups, we found a main effect for time, Wilks’ λ = .726, F(6, 146) = 9.203, p <.001, η2p = .274 —specifically, more favorable scores at Time 2 compared to Time 1 in ethnocultural empathy, color-blind racial attitudes, and multicultural experiences. Notably, the main effect for modality was statistically nonsignificant, Wilks’ λ =.988, F(6, 146) = 0.291, p = .940, η2p = .012, reflecting similar general gains across modalities. However, a significant time by modality interaction within groups, Wilks’ λ = .888, F(6, 146) = 3.063, p = .007, η2p = .112, suggested that in-person students had more favorable movement than online students between Time 1 and Time 2 on specific measures of ethnocultural empathy and color-blind racial attitudes. Results show that shifts in multicultural domains can be possible through mirroring gold standard courses in multicultural psychology regardless of the teaching modality. Results appear to be somewhat attenuated for online compared to in-person students. Recommendations for changes in teaching strategies and further evaluation are discussed. 
Full-texts of the citations in the database are protected by copyright. If you would like to read the full articles, please check your academic library. For more information, read the FAQ.
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2020, Translational Issues in Psychological Science, 6, 160-174.
  |   Psychology  |   Traditional, Fully online  |   155 Undergraduate
Quantitative skills, critical thinking, and writing mechanics in blended versus face-to-face versions of a research methods and statistics course.
Goode, C. T. , Lamoreaux, M., Atchison, K. J. , Jeffress, E. C. , Lynch, H. L., Sheehan, E.
Hybrid or blended learning (BL) has been shown to be equivalent to or better than face-to-face (FTF) instruction in a broad variety of contexts. We randomly assigned students … [more]
Hybrid or blended learning (BL) has been shown to be equivalent to or better than face-to-face (FTF) instruction in a broad variety of contexts. We randomly assigned students to either 50/50 BL or 100% FTF versions of a research methods and statistics in psychology course. Students who took the BL version of the course scored significantly lower on measures of quantitative mastery of statistical concepts than those who took the FTF version; however, the size of this effect was quite small. We detected no significant difference between BL and FTF in the expression of critical thinking through writing or writing mechanics. The greatest difference in performance was among instructors regardless of instruction type. We discuss these results in the context of increasing online and BL instruction, particularly with regard to teaching psychological statistics, research methods, and critical thinking. 
Full-texts of the citations in the database are protected by copyright. If you would like to read the full articles, please check your academic library. For more information, read the FAQ.
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2018, Teaching of Psychology, 45, 124-131.
  |   Psychology  |   Traditional, Blended/hybrid  |   161 Undergraduate
Comparing delivery approaches to teaching abnormal psychology: Investigating student perceptions and learning outcomes.
Goette, W. F., Delello, J. A., Schmitt, A. L., Sullivan, J. R., Rangel, A.
This study compares the academic performance and perceptions of 114 undergraduate students enrolled in an abnormal psychology course. Specifically, this study focuses on whether face-to-face (F2F) or blended … [more]
This study compares the academic performance and perceptions of 114 undergraduate students enrolled in an abnormal psychology course. Specifically, this study focuses on whether face-to-face (F2F) or blended modalities are associated with student learning outcomes. In this study, data analysis was based upon the examination of end-of-course grades, final exams, and an end-of-course survey. The data revealed that the same course presented in a F2F and a hybrid modality was associated with nearly identical learning outcomes in terms of student evaluations and final exam scores. However, students did note differences in course delivery in terms of time, assessment, and overall structure. 
Full-texts of the citations in the database are protected by copyright. If you would like to read the full articles, please check your academic library. For more information, read the FAQ.
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2017, Psychology Learning & Teaching, 16(3), 336-352.
  |   Psychology  |   Traditional, Fully online  |   114 Undergraduate
Comparison of live versus online instruction of a novel soft skills course in Mongolia.
Mahadevan, A., Strehlow, M. C., Dorjsuren, K., Newberry, J. A.
BackgroundSoft skills are essential for employee success in the global marketplace; however, many developing countries lack content experts to provide the requisite instruction to an emerging workforce. … [more]
Background
Soft skills are essential for employee success in the global marketplace; however, many developing countries lack content experts to provide the requisite instruction to an emerging workforce. One possible solution is to use an online, open-access curriculum. To date, no studies on soft skills curricula using an online learning platform have been undertaken in Mongolia.
Objective
To evaluate the efficacy of an online versus classroom platform to deliver a novel soft skills course in Mongolia.
Methods
A series of eight lectures along with corresponding surveys and multiple-choice question tests were developed and translated into the Mongolian language. Two different delivery modalities, online and traditional classroom lectures, were then compared for knowledge gain, comfort level, and satisfaction. Knowledge gain and comfort level were assessed pre- and post-course, while satisfaction was assessed only post-course.
Results
Enrollment in the online and classroom courses was 89 students and 291 students, respectively. Sixty-two online students (68% female) and 114 classroom students (77% female) completed the entire course and took the post-test. The online cohort had higher pre-test scores than the classroom cohort (46.4% and 37.3%, respectively, p < 0.01). The online cohort’s overall knowledge gain was not significant (0.4%, p=0.87), but the classroom cohort’s knowledge gain was significant (13.9%, p < 0.01). Both the online and classroom cohorts demonstrated significant improvement in overall comfort level for all soft skills topics (p < 0.01). Both cohorts were also highly satisfied with the course, as assessed on a Likert scale (4.59 for online, 4.40 for classroom).
Conclusion
The study compared two cohorts of Mongolian college students who took either an online or classroom-based soft skills course, and it was found that knowledge gain was significantly higher for the classroom group, while comfort and satisfaction with individual course topics was comparable. 
Full-texts of the citations in the database are protected by copyright. If you would like to read the full articles, please check your academic library. For more information, read the FAQ.
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2017, Cureus, 107.
  |   Psychology  |   Traditional, Fully online  |   176 Undergraduate & Graduate
Grades, student satisfaction and retention in online and face-to-face introductory psychology units: A test of equivalency theory.
Garratt-Reed, D., Roberts, L. D., Heritage, B.
There has been a recent rapid growth in the number of psychology courses offered online through institutions of higher education. The American Psychological Association has highlighted the importance … [more]
There has been a recent rapid growth in the number of psychology courses offered online through institutions of higher education. The American Psychological Association has highlighted the importance of ensuring the effectiveness of online psychology courses (Halonen et al., 2013). Despite this, there have been inconsistent findings regarding student grades, satisfaction, and retention in online psychology units. Equivalency Theory (Simonson, 1999; Simonson et al., 1999) posits that online and classroom-based learners will attain equivalent learning outcomes when equivalent learning experiences are provided. We present a study of an online introductory psychology unit designed to provide equivalent learning experiences to the pre-existing face-to-face version of the unit. Using quasi-experimental methods, academic performance, student feedback, and retention data from 866 Australian undergraduate psychology students were examined to assess whether the online unit developed to provide equivalent learning experiences produced comparable outcomes to the ‘traditional’ unit delivered face-to-face. Student grades did not significantly differ between modes of delivery, except for a group-work based assessment where online students performed more poorly. Student satisfaction was generally high in both modes of the unit, with group-work the key source of dissatisfaction in the online unit. The results provide partial support for Equivalency Theory. The group-work based assessment did not provide an equivalent learning experience for students in the online unit highlighting the need for further research to determine effective methods of engaging students in online group activities. Consistent with previous research, retention rates were significantly lower in the online unit, indicating the need to develop effective strategies to increase online retention rates. While this study demonstrates successes in presenting students with an equivalent learning experience, we recommend that future research investigate means of successfully facilitating collaborative group-work assessment, and to explore contributing factors to actual student retention in online units beyond that of non-equivalent learning experiences. 
Full-texts of the citations in the database are protected by copyright. If you would like to read the full articles, please check your academic library. For more information, read the FAQ.
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2016, Frontiers in Psychology, 7.
  |   Psychology  |   Traditional, Fully online  |   866 Undergraduate
Testing the efficacy of MyPsychLab to replace traditional instruction in a hybrid course.
Powers, K. L., Brooks, P. J., Galazyn, M., Donnelly, S.
Online course-packs are marketed as improving grades in introductory-level coursework, yet it is unknown whether these course-packs can effectively replace, as opposed to supplement, in-class instruction. This study … [more]
Online course-packs are marketed as improving grades in introductory-level coursework, yet it is unknown whether these course-packs can effectively replace, as opposed to supplement, in-class instruction. This study compared learning outcomes for Introductory Psychology students in hybrid and traditional sections, with hybrid sections replacing 30% of in-class time with online homework using the MyPsychLab course-pack and Blackboard course management system. Data collected over two semesters (N = 730 students in six hybrid and nine traditional sections of ~50 students) indicated equivalent final-grade averages and rates of class attrition. Although exam averages did not differ by class format, exam grades in hybrid sections decreased to a significantly greater extent over the course of the semester than in traditional sections. MyPsychLab homework grades in hybrid sections correlated with exam grades, but were relatively low (66.4%) due to incomplete work—suggesting that hybrid students may have engaged with course materials less than traditional students. Faculty who taught in both formats noted positive features of hybrid teaching, but preferred traditional classes, citing challenges in time management and student usage of instructional technology. Although hybrid students often reported difficulties or displeasure in working online about half of them indicated interest in taking other hybrid classes. 
Full-texts of the citations in the database are protected by copyright. If you would like to read the full articles, please check your academic library. For more information, read the FAQ.
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2016, Psychology Learning & Teaching, 15(1), 6-30.
  |   Psychology  |   Traditional, Blended/hybrid  |   730 Undergraduate
Comparing student performance in online and face-to-face delivery modalities.
Helms, J. L.
The purpose of the research was to compare student performance in an online or face-to-face (F2F) required Psychology course on three distinct sets of variables (i.e., pre-course, … [more]
The purpose of the research was to compare student performance in an online or face-to-face (F2F) required Psychology course on three distinct sets of variables (i.e., pre-course, course, and post-course variables). Analyses revealed mixed significant and nonsignificant results. Students did not differ in terms of such variables as hours transferred to the university from prior schools, total hours earned toward their degrees, and number of hours currently attempted. However, online students had significantly lower grade point averages, missed significantly more grade opportunities, and were significantly more likely to fail the course compared to their F2F counterparts. These and other results are discussed in relation to potentially developing a different lens through which to view student performance in online courses. 
Full-texts of the citations in the database are protected by copyright. If you would like to read the full articles, please check your academic library. For more information, read the FAQ.
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2014, Journal of Asynchronous Learning Networks, 18.
  |   Psychology  |   Traditional, Blended/hybrid, Fully online  |   96 Undergraduate
Online learning: Outcomes and satisfaction among underprepared students in an upper-level psychology course.
McDonough, C., Palmerio Roberts, R., Hummel, J.
Online learning is on the rise, but research on outcomes and student satisfaction has produced conflicting results, and systematic, targeted research on underprepared college students is generally lacking. … [more]
Online learning is on the rise, but research on outcomes and student satisfaction has produced conflicting results, and systematic, targeted research on underprepared college students is generally lacking. This study compared three sections (traditional, online, and 50% hybrid) of the same upper-level psychology course, taught with identical materials by the same instructor. Although exam scores were marginally higher in the traditional course, final grades and written assignments did not differ across sections, nor did student satisfaction. Student engagement predicted outcomes online. Taken together, these results suggest that outcomes and satisfaction are equivalent in online, hybrid, and traditional courses, and that a student's own diligence and drive might better predict success in online learning. 
Full-texts of the citations in the database are protected by copyright. If you would like to read the full articles, please check your academic library. For more information, read the FAQ.
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2014, Online Journal of Distance Learning Administration, 17(3).
  |   Psychology  |   Traditional, Blended/hybrid, Fully online  |   81 Undergraduate
Comparing student achievement in online and face-to-face classes.
Dell, C. A., Low, C., Wilker, J. F.
A research project was conducted to analyze student achievement using submitted assignments for two sections of a graduate course in human development and learning, taught both online and … [more]
A research project was conducted to analyze student achievement using submitted assignments for two sections of a graduate course in human development and learning, taught both online and face-to-face, as well as three sections of undergraduate educational psychology, two of which were taught face-to-face, and one taught online. Results suggest there were no significant differences between the work submitted by students from the online sections and from the face-to-face students, and that the methods of instruction are more important than the delivery platform. 
Full-texts of the citations in the database are protected by copyright. If you would like to read the full articles, please check your academic library. For more information, read the FAQ.
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2010, Journal of Online Learning and Teaching, 6(1), 30-42.
  |   Psychology  |   Traditional, Fully online  |   59 Graduate, Undergraduate
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This Ecampus Research Unit project is a searchable resource of academic studies of education efficacy across modalities. Filter by discipline or journal to find research in your subject area of interest. View overview or read the FAQ.

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