Online Learning Efficacy Research Database

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Showing 31 - 40 of 289 citations
Face-to-face, blended, flipped, or online learning environment? Impact on learning performance and student cognitions.
Thai, N. T. T. , De Wever, B., Valcke, M.
This study compares four learning environments: face-to-face learning (F2F), fully e-learning (EL), blended learning (BL), and flipped classroom (FC) with respect to students' learning performance. Moreover, this present … [more]
This study compares four learning environments: face-to-face learning (F2F), fully e-learning (EL), blended learning (BL), and flipped classroom (FC) with respect to students' learning performance. Moreover, this present research studies changes in perceived flexibility, intrinsic motivation, self-efficacy beliefs of students, and the interaction effects in these student variables on learning performance. Two learning environment design elements: (1) lectures (2) group discussions building on guiding questions, were manipulated to create the four learning environments. Third-year undergraduate students (n = 106), enrolled in the “Animal and Human Physiology” course at CanTho University (Vietnam), were randomly assigned to one of the four learning environments. The results suggest a significant positive differential effect on learning performance when studying in a FC and BL setting. No significant interaction effects could be observed regarding changes in perceived flexibility, intrinsic motivation and self-efficacy. However, significant differences between learning conditions were observed in perceived flexibility. Analysis of focus group data corroborate the finding that students experience more flexibility in time and place when studying in FC, BL and EL environments. In addition, students in a FC environment reflect significantly larger positive changes in their self-efficacy. But, the qualitative data show how positive perceptions about flexibility, motivation and self-efficacy are often cancelled out by negative perceptions. 
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2020, Journal of Computer Assisted Learning, 36(3), 397-411.
  |   Physiology  |   Traditional, Blended/hybrid, Fully online  |   106 Undergraduate
The effect of course format on student learning in introductory biomechanics courses that utilise low-tech active learning exercises.
Wallace, B., Knudson, D.
Low-tech active learning (AL) exercises in face-to-face (F2F) undergraduate biomechanics courses improve student learning vs. lecture alone. This study compared learning of biomechanics concepts with AL implemented in … [more]
Low-tech active learning (AL) exercises in face-to-face (F2F) undergraduate biomechanics courses improve student learning vs. lecture alone. This study compared learning of biomechanics concepts with AL implemented in two course formats (hybrid: HB vs. F2F). Additional aims were to investigate if student perceptions of learning epistemology and learning factors were related to course format. Students (n = 110) in four introductory biomechanics courses (two F2F, two HB) completed the 24-question Biomechanics Concept Inventory (BCI) at the beginning and the end of the course to determine their learning of biomechanical concepts. An additional eight questions were given with the post-test to determine student perceptions of the AL exercises and their epistemology of learning. Learning in the HB format was equivalent to the F2F course format when both implement AL in these students. Student perceptions of AL were generally positive and learning scores consistent with previous research on AL in biomechanics. There were mixed results of the effect of course format with one significant difference of three ratings of the nature of learning biomechanics and one significant difference of four ratings of AL by students. These results should be replicated and potential interactions with student perceptions and characteristics explored. 
Full-texts of the citations in the database are protected by copyright. If you would like to read the full articles, please check your academic library. For more information, read the FAQ.
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2020, Sports Biomechanics, 1-10.
  |   Sports  |   Traditional, Blended/hybrid  |   110 Undergraduate
Virtual and traditional classes of English language at UQU: A comparative study of learning outcomes.
Al-Asmari, A.
Many earlier studies assessed virtual vs. traditional learning outcomes. The majority of them had two limitations. (1) learners self-selection of virtual classes, and (2) the lack of exams … [more]
Many earlier studies assessed virtual vs. traditional learning outcomes. The majority of them had two limitations. (1) learners self-selection of virtual classes, and (2) the lack of exams proctoring. It has been stated that these factors give more opportunities of unrealistic elevation of learning outcomes of virtual classes over the traditional ones. This study is of comparative corpus-based nature applied on 1324 male students of Medicine enrolled in Joint First Year Program (JFYP) at Umm Al-Qura University (UQU) in the first semesters of the academic years (2017-2018) and (2018-2019). Participants of this study were given English classification test before commencing their JFYP. In the first semester of the academic year (2017-2018), 624 students were taught English in traditional classes by the English Language Center (ELC) at UQU. The other 700 students studied English through virtual classes by TeachCast with Oxford via Eleutian platform. Then, all participants sat for final exams by the end of their first semesters. Comparing the participants’ grade in these two tests is meant to (1) test the claims of the earlier studies, (2) reveal the impact of English instruction by the ELC at UQU and (3) disclose whether the English learning outcomes of controlled virtual classes surpass the traditional classes’ or not. Findings of this study indicated that the learning outcomes of virtual classes significantly surpassed the traditional classes although the affecting factors stated by earlier studies were eliminated. Then, the study recommendations were suggested. 
Full-texts of the citations in the database are protected by copyright. If you would like to read the full articles, please check your academic library. For more information, read the FAQ.
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2019, Saudi Journal of Humanities and Social Sciences, 4(5), 311-315.
  |   English Language  |   Traditional, Fully online  |   1,363 Undergraduate
Comparing and contrasting the interactional performance of teachers and students in traditional and virtual classrooms of advanced writing course in distance education university.
Asadi, N. , Khodabandeh, F., Yekta, R. R.
Since interaction provides the opportunity for students to share their ideas, thoughts, comments and feelings with their peers and teacher, it can be claimed that it is an … [more]
Since interaction provides the opportunity for students to share their ideas, thoughts, comments and feelings with their peers and teacher, it can be claimed that it is an integral component of learning. The present study applied the Sinclair and Coulthard’s interaction (IRF) (1975) model on the English learners of two traditional and virtual classes in order to investigate the differences between their writing scores in these two classes on the one hand, and the extent to which the IRF structure occurs in these two classes on the other hand. For this purpose, 79 and 20 intermediate level EFL learners were selected from the virtual and traditional classes of Payame Noor University (PNU). They were given the pre-test at the beginning and post-test after eight sessions of the same treatment in both classes by the same instructor. Their pre- and post-test scores were compared. The results indicated that there was a significant difference between the participants’ post-test scores in two classes in terms of three components of the intended six components of the five-paragraph essay. This study concluded that the participants in the virtual class performed better than their peers in the traditional one. Moreover, the number of interactions between the participants and teacher was more in the virtual class. Since the effect of interaction between the students and teacher on better performance and learning was shown in this study, other teachers can take into consideration the importance of interaction as well as technology for better teaching-learning process. 
Full-texts of the citations in the database are protected by copyright. If you would like to read the full articles, please check your academic library. For more information, read the FAQ.
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2019, Turkish Online Journal of Distance Education, 20, 135-148.
  |   English Language Writing  |   Traditional, Fully online  |   99 Undergraduate
Comparison of academic performance of students in online vs traditional engineering course.
Bir, D.D.
Universities in the U.S. typically offer to teach introductory engineering courses in large classes to tackle the increase in undergraduate engineering enrolment and to save on cost … [more]
Universities in the U.S. typically offer to teach introductory engineering courses in large classes to tackle the increase in undergraduate engineering enrolment and to save on cost of teaching. Previous studies done on traditionally taught large classes have shown the negative effects it has on students and faculty. Many institutions use online courses to teach these large classes due to the flexibility they provide students with in their schedule and pace of learning, as well as being less expensive for the university. This study aimed to investigate the effect of online pedagogy on the academic performance of students enrolled in mechanics of materials course taught at a U.S. Midwestern University. The findings of the study reveal that the online pedagogy had a negative effect on student academic performance when compared with the traditionally taught group. This was true for all demographics (gender, enrolment status, nationality) and categories (high, medium and low academic performance) of students except for high performing students for whom online pedagogy shows promise. 
Full-texts of the citations in the database are protected by copyright. If you would like to read the full articles, please check your academic library. For more information, read the FAQ.
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2019, European Journal of Open, Distance and E-learning, Distance and E-Learning, 22(1).
  |   Engineering  |   Traditional, Fully online  |   80 Undergraduate
Online versus face-to-face public speaking outcomes: A comprehensive assessment.
Broeckelman-Post, M. A. , Hyatt Hawkins, K. E. , Arciero, A. R. , Malterud, A. S.
In an attempt to meet rising student demand and cost-effectively deliver instruction, colleges and universities are offering more online courses. Despite the increasing growth of the online format, … [more]
In an attempt to meet rising student demand and cost-effectively deliver instruction, colleges and universities are offering more online courses. Despite the increasing growth of the online format, there remains a question of the effectiveness of this instructional delivery method. We evaluated the relative effectiveness of a public speaking course in both the online and the traditional face-to-face formats at a large, public university in the mid-Atlantic region. A series of MANOVAs were run to test the differences in performance and other student growth indicators between course formats. While the students in the online courses demonstrated higher behavioral engagement, the majority of indicators were similar across formats. The technology might explain the observed differences in online courses, which permits students to correct mistakes and re-record a presentation before submitting it, or the larger withdrawal rate which may selectively remove those students who may have done poorly in either format. Implications for future research and practice are presented. 
Full-texts of the citations in the database are protected by copyright. If you would like to read the full articles, please check your academic library. For more information, read the FAQ.
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2019, Basic Communication Course Annual, 31, 144-170.
  |   Communications  |   Traditional, Fully online  |   401 Undergraduate
Asynchronous versus traditional teaching for MBBS undergraduate students-effectiveness and students' perspectives - A pilot study.
Chauhan, V. D., Kalra, J. , Kalra, V., Negi, G., Agarwal, P.
Traditional lectures continue to be one of the common ways of teaching practiced in medical schools across India. However, there are many other effective ways of teaching in … [more]
Traditional lectures continue to be one of the common ways of teaching practiced in medical schools across India. However, there are many other effective ways of teaching in large groups and lately e-learning modules, which can be synchronous, asynchronous, or blended, have been used to complement face-to-face interactions. E-assignments have been effectively used to engage students into meaningful learning. Aim: The aim of the study is to compare asynchronous teaching with traditional teaching in terms of student perspectives and learning. Materials and Methods: After taking ethical clearance from the Institutional Ethics Committee, the study was conducted involving 66 student volunteers from MBBS 2nd year. All the students were subjected to a pretest on the topic – “low backache” prior to the intervention. The students were then divided into two groups: Group A and Group B of 33 students each. Group A was taught by traditional lecture method, while Group B was given an e-assignment on the topic for which no face-to-face interaction was done earlier. The students from both the groups were then subjected to a posttest followed by feedback. Results: Analysis of covariance, considering the pretest score as a covariate, revealed that the two groups were comparable to begin with P = 0.632. After the intervention, posttest mean scores improved significantly (P < 0.001) within each group, for both the groups, but there was no significant difference in posttest scores on intergroup comparison (P = 0.507). Student feedback brought to light that 85% of the students felt that the traditional lecture method followed by e-learning would be of a great benefit to them. Conclusion: Although no single method emerged as superior over the other, student feedback revealed that 90% of the students graded e-module as either satisfactory to good. Most felt that lecture followed by e-modules will help them to learn better. 
Full-texts of the citations in the database are protected by copyright. If you would like to read the full articles, please check your academic library. For more information, read the FAQ.
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2019, International Journal of Applied & Basic Medical Research, 9(2), 69-72.
  |   Medicine  |   Traditional, Fully online  |   66 Undergraduate
Impact of e-learning vs traditional learning on students' performance and attitude.
Elfaki, N. K. , Ahmed, I. A. M. , Abdulrahim, R.
With the proliferation of internet technology, the E-learning has become an essential method and new epitome that is widely used and implemented by educational institutions across the globe. … [more]
With the proliferation of internet technology, the E-learning has become an essential method and new epitome that is widely used and implemented by educational institutions across the globe. The main objective of the current survey was to study the impact of E-learning on the students' academic performance. It was a facility-based and quasi-experimental research design that carried out in Najran University- college of nursing during the period from January to August 2019. By adopting a purposive sampling technique, 80 under-graduate nursing students (40 experimental groups + 40 as controls) that aged 21-24 years old had been recruited to participate in the current survey. Final exam results and a self-administered questionnaire were used for collecting data. The findings revealed that the mean scores obtained by students in the final exam by the E-learning group (Experimental) is statistically significantly higher than those for the traditional group (controls) (t=3.45, df=37, P value= 0.002). Additionally, the results showed that the mean of the students' overall satisfaction with the traditional face-to-face lectures in the control group was 6.26, while the mean of the students' overall satisfaction with E-learning in the experimental group was 8.74. The difference between students' attitudes was significant (P = 0.015) in favor of the experimental group. The key findings of the present study show a significant difference in learning outcomes besides positive attitudes between online and traditional learners which can be a viable alternative learning method for higher education. It also contributes to the current literature in the area of online instruction and E-learning. 
Full-texts of the citations in the database are protected by copyright. If you would like to read the full articles, please check your academic library. For more information, read the FAQ.
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2019, International Medical Journal, 24, 225-233.
  |   Nursing Education  |   Traditional, Fully online  |   80 Undergraduate
The evaluation of a hybrid, general chemistry laboratory curriculum: Impact on students’ cognitive, affective, and psychomotor learning.
Enneking, K. M. , Breitenstein, G. R. , Coleman, A. F. , Reeves, J. H., Wang, Y. , Grove, N. P.
The laboratory has occupied an important place in the general chemistry curriculum for well over a century, despite the fact that many have voiced concern about its value … [more]
The laboratory has occupied an important place in the general chemistry curriculum for well over a century, despite the fact that many have voiced concern about its value and utility. In an effort to potentially increase capacity in our general chemistry courses, we developed and implemented a hybrid laboratory curriculum that consisted of alternating face-to-face and virtual laboratory experiments. This study sought to better understand the impact that this hybrid approach had on students’ cognitive, affective, and psychomotor learning. The results suggest that students taught using the hybrid approach developed similar cognitive and psychomotor skills in comparison to students taught using a traditional laboratory curriculum; however, their affective outlook toward chemistry was significantly lower 
Full-texts of the citations in the database are protected by copyright. If you would like to read the full articles, please check your academic library. For more information, read the FAQ.
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2019, Journal of Chemical Education, 96, 1058-1067.
  |   Chemistry  |   Traditional, Blended/hybrid  |   1,141 Undergraduate
Effects of course modality in summer session: Enrollment patterns and student performance in face-to-face and online classes.
Fischer, C. , Xu, D. , Rodriguez, F. , Denaro, K. , Warschauer, M.
Online summer courses offer opportunities to catch-up or stay on-track with course credits for students who cannot otherwise attend face-to-face summer courses. While online courses may have certain … [more]
Online summer courses offer opportunities to catch-up or stay on-track with course credits for students who cannot otherwise attend face-to-face summer courses. While online courses may have certain advantages, participation patterns and student success in summer terms are not yet well understood. This quantitative study analyzed four years of institutional data cumulating in 72,441 course enrollments of 23,610 students in 433 courses during summer terms at a large public research university. Multi-level logistic regression models indicated that characteristics including gender, in-state residency, admission test scores, previous online course enrollment, and course size, among others, can influence student enrollment by course modality. Multi-way fixed effects linear regression models indicated that student grades were slightly lower in online courses compared to face-to-face courses. However, at-risk college student populations (low-income students, first-generation students, low-performing students) were not found to suffer additional course performance penalties of online course participation. 
Full-texts of the citations in the database are protected by copyright. If you would like to read the full articles, please check your academic library. For more information, read the FAQ.
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2019, The Internet and Higher Education, 45, 1-9.
  |   Multiple  |   Traditional, Fully online  |   23,610 Undergraduate
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This Ecampus Research Unit project is a searchable resource of academic studies of education efficacy across modalities. Filter by discipline or journal to find research in your subject area of interest. View overview or read the FAQ.

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