Online Learning Efficacy Research Database

Filters

Modality

 
 
 
 

Peer-​reviewed

 

Sample



Showing 41 - 50 of 289 citations
Exclusively synchronous online (VIRI) learning: The impact on student performance and engagement outcomes.
Francescucci, A., Rohani, L.
There are growing trends in postsecondary education that emphasize the importance of online and technology-enabled learning. This study aims to investigate whether the use of virtual, interactive, real-time, … [more]
There are growing trends in postsecondary education that emphasize the importance of online and technology-enabled learning. This study aims to investigate whether the use of virtual, interactive, real-time, instructor-led (VIRI) online learning can deliver the same student performance and engagement outcomes as a face-to-face (F2F) course. The data consist of 698 participants taught in eight sections, over two semesters, with two different instructors. An analysis of variance was used to compare the differences for both student performance and engagement outcomes. The findings show that a synchronous course delivered using VIRI classroom technology has the same level of student performance outcomes as F2F learning. This study suggests that VIRI technology is an effective synchronous learning environment. 
Full-texts of the citations in the database are protected by copyright. If you would like to read the full articles, please check your academic library. For more information, read the FAQ.
[less]
2019, Journal of Marketing Education, 41(1), 60-69.
  |   Marketing  |   Traditional, Fully online  |   698 Undergraduate
The costs of online learning: Examining differences in motivation and academic outcomes in online and face-to-face community college developmental mathematics courses
Francis, M. K., Wormington, S. V., Hulleman, C.
Although online courses are becoming increasingly popular in higher education, evidence is inconclusive regarding whether online students are likely to be as academically successful and motivated as students … [more]
Although online courses are becoming increasingly popular in higher education, evidence is inconclusive regarding whether online students are likely to be as academically successful and motivated as students in face-to-face courses. In this study, we documented online and face-to-face students’ academic motivation and outcomes in community college mathematics courses, and whether differences might vary based on student characteristics (i.e., gender, underrepresented ethnic/racial minority status, first-generation college status, and adult learner status). Over 2,400 developmental mathematics students reported on their math motivation at the beginning (Week 1) and middle (Weeks 3, 5) of the semester. Findings indicated that online students received lower grades and were less likely to pass from their courses than face-to-face students, with online adult learners receiving particularly low final course grades and pass rates. In contrast, online and face-to-face students did not differ on incoming motivation, with subgroup analyses suggesting largely similar patterns of motivation across student groups. Together, findings suggest that online and faceto-face students may differ overall in academic outcomes but not in their motivation or differentially based on student characteristics. Small but significant differences on academic outcomes across modalities (Cohen’s ds = 0.17–0.28) have implications for community college students’ success in online learning environments, particularly for adult learners who are most likely to be faced with competing demands. 
Full-texts of the citations in the database are protected by copyright. If you would like to read the full articles, please check your academic library. For more information, read the FAQ.
[less]
2019, Frontiers in Psychology, 10, 1-12.
  |   Mathematics  |   Traditional, Fully online  |   2,411 Undergraduate
Closing the achievement gap in a large introductory course by balancing reduced in-person contact with increased course structure.
Gavassa, S. , Benabentos, R., Kravec, M., Collins, T., Eddy, S.
Hybrid and online courses are gaining attention as alternatives to traditional face-to-face classes. In addition to the pedagogical flexibility afforded by alternative formats, these courses also appeal to … [more]
Hybrid and online courses are gaining attention as alternatives to traditional face-to-face classes. In addition to the pedagogical flexibility afforded by alternative formats, these courses also appeal to campuses aiming to maximize classroom space. The literature, however, reports conflicting results regarding the effect of hybrid and online courses on student learning. We designed, taught, and assessed a fully online course (100% online) and a hybrid-and-flipped course (50% online 50% face-to-face) and compared those for¬mats with a lecture-based face-to-face course. The three formats also varied in the degree of structure; the hybrid course was the most structured and the face-to-face course was the least structured. All three courses were taught by the same instructor in a large His¬panic-serving research university. We found that exam scores for all students were lowest in the face-to-face course. Hispanic and Black students had higher scores in the hybrid format compared with online and face-to-face, while white students had the highest per¬formance in the online format. We conclude that a hybrid course format with high struc¬ture can improve exam performance for traditionally underrepresented students, closing the achievement gap even while in-person contact hours are reduced. 
Full-texts of the citations in the database are protected by copyright. If you would like to read the full articles, please check your academic library. For more information, read the FAQ.
[less]
2019, CBE-Life Sciences Education, 18 (8), 1-10.
  |   Biology  |   Traditional, Blended/hybrid, Fully online  |   410 Undergraduate
Rehabilitation and mental health counselor education program.
Holmes, C. , Reid, C.
Background: Despite the increasing reliance in counselor education on online teaching and learning, the efficacy is not well documented.Objective: To investigate learning outcomes for master’s-level rehabilitation … [more]
Background: Despite the increasing reliance in counselor education on online teaching and learning, the efficacy is not well documented.
Objective: To investigate learning outcomes for master’s-level rehabilitation and mental health counseling students.
Methods: This study compared on-campus and online learning course delivery methods with pre-and post-tests using 41 participants across four courses.
Findings: Significant differences were found within both groups between the pre- and post-test, indicating significant gains in knowledge acquisition. No significant differences were found between group modalities in the magnitude of improvement in test scores.
Conclusions: Findings suggest that no differences exist in these learning outcomes when online and on-campus teaching modalities are compared and that both modalities produce positive learning outcomes. Continued research is needed to address additional questions in this area. 
Full-texts of the citations in the database are protected by copyright. If you would like to read the full articles, please check your academic library. For more information, read the FAQ.
[less]
2019, Rehabilitation, Research, Policy, and Education, Policy, and Education, 33, 180-183.
  |   Education  |   Traditional, Fully online  |   41 Graduate
Cognitive learning in large lectures of the basic communication course: Does delivery format matter?
Jacobi, L., Cvancara, K.
Both large lectures and online formats are encouraged as viable options for the delivery of course material in higher education today, especially in large general education courses. However, … [more]
Both large lectures and online formats are encouraged as viable options for the delivery of course material in higher education today, especially in large general education courses. However, how do such delivery formats impact student learning? In an effort to understand how lecture format impacts cognitive learning, this study investigated how the delivery format impacts the actual and perceived cognitive learning of students in a basic communication course in a midsized Midwestern university. Using one-way between-subjects ANOVA, earned exam grades, coded written reflections, and scores from a cognitive learning perception scale were compared across online, hybrid, and face-
to-face lecture delivery formats. As predicted, no significant differences on any of the dependent variables were identified, indicating a lack of influence of delivery format on actual or perceived levels of cognitive learning. However, aspects of teacher immediacy, student learning preferences, and degree of interaction in recitation sections is discussed, along with implications for future research. 
Full-texts of the citations in the database are protected by copyright. If you would like to read the full articles, please check your academic library. For more information, read the FAQ.
[less]
2019, The Journal of General Education
  |   Communications  |   Traditional, Blended/hybrid, Fully online  |   584 Undergraduate
Learning to evaluate sources: Comparing teaching modalities and student outcomes
Leporati, B. R. , Bach, P., Hong, L.
While educators and librarians have long been concerned with developing undergraduates’ ability to find credible sources, the abundance of unreliable information online has exponentially complicated the situation. In … [more]
While educators and librarians have long been concerned with developing undergraduates’ ability to find credible sources, the abundance of unreliable information online has exponentially complicated the situation. In developing a new curriculum for English Composition 1001 classes, a first-year writing class at the University of Cincinnati, we developed new ways of engaging with student experiences before and beyond the class sessions to address source analysis through active peer learning. Using an action research framework to position ourselves as both practitioners and researchers, we considered our own practice as teachers as much as student outcomes. We compared the use of flipped content with in-class instruction. By capturing students’ research process through pre-class and post-class surveys, we could better understand the online ecosystem they must navigate and help them reflect critically on their progress. Our analysis of student survey responses allowed us to measure progress in three areas: source quality, search strategy, and topic relevance. Flipped class activities had the same result on student behavior as did in-class delivery. 
Full-texts of the citations in the database are protected by copyright. If you would like to read the full articles, please check your academic library. For more information, read the FAQ.
[less]
2019, Portal: Libraries and the Academy, 19 (1), 233-252.
  |   Library Instruction  |   Traditional, Blended/hybrid  |   596 Undergraduate
Feasibility of face-to-face and online learning methods to provide nutrition education to midwives, general practice nurses and student nurses.
Lucas, C. J. , Lyell, E. , Koch, B. , Elder, V. , Cummins, L. , Lambert, S. , McMahon, A. T., Charlton, K. E.
Midwives and general practice nurses are ideally positioned to provide nutrition education to pregnant women. However, it appears that they do not receive sufficient nutrition training to enable … [more]
Midwives and general practice nurses are ideally positioned to provide nutrition education to pregnant women. However, it appears that they do not receive sufficient nutrition training to enable them to fulfil this role. This study aimed to develop, implement and evaluate a suite of learning resources developed specifically for midwives, general practice nurses and student nurses. A four-module suite of learning resources was developed based on recommendations in the Australian Antenatal Care Clinical Guidelines as well as formative evaluation with stakeholders. The feasibility of these modules was tested using a pre-test and post-test quasi-experimental design with three arms using convenient sampling (face-to-face with midwives; online with student nurses; and online with midwives, nurses and practice nurses). Completion rates across the three study arms were poor (n=40 participants in total). For the combined data, there was a significant increase in knowledge scores across all modules from the pretest score (median (IQR): 3.46 (2.09–4.13)) to the post-test score (5.66 (4.66–6.00)) (p<0.001). Studies of high quality are required to determine if changing the nutrition knowledge and confidence in delivering nutrition care of health professionals results in sustainable changes to their clinical practice. 
Full-texts of the citations in the database are protected by copyright. If you would like to read the full articles, please check your academic library. For more information, read the FAQ.
[less]
2019, BMJ Nutrition, Prevention & Health, Prevention & Health, 1-6.
Nursing  |   Traditional, Fully online  |   40 Undergraduate & Graduate
Collection-based education by distance and face to face: Learning outcomes and academic dishonesty.
Lucky, A. , Branham, M., Atchison, R.
Assembling and curating specimen collections is a valuable educational exercise that integrates subject-specific skills such as field collection, curation, identification, organization, and interpretation of relationships. Collection projects have … [more]
Assembling and curating specimen collections is a valuable educational exercise that integrates subject-specific skills such as field collection, curation, identification, organization, and interpretation of relationships. Collection projects have been used primarily in face-to-face classes, but they can be readily adapted for distance education. The primary challenges to using collection projects in distance education center on two concerns: (1) whether distance students learn as much as their face-to-face peers and (2) whether academic dishonesty occurs more often in distance education than face to face. This study addressed both concerns by assessing learning outcomes in two entomology courses with both face-to-face and distance sections and evaluating the frequency of specimen-based plagiarism (submitting specimens collected by someone else). An ungraded survey testing students’ insect identification knowledge found equivalent learning outcomes in face-to-face and distance classes. Insect collections were monitored for plagiarized (resubmitted or purchased) specimens in a 5-year “mark-release-recapture’ investigation. Academic dishonesty was detected in fewer than 2% of collections; cheating was more than 12 times more likely in distance than in face-to-face classes. This study’s findings raise the possibility that distance learning assessments can be artificially inflated by cheating, suggesting that evaluations of distance learning should be considered in light of academic dishonesty. These results highlight the benefits and challenges of collections as teaching tools in distance education and underscore the need for instructors to be vigilant about academic integrity. 
Full-texts of the citations in the database are protected by copyright. If you would like to read the full articles, please check your academic library. For more information, read the FAQ.
[less]
2019, Journal of Science Education and Technology, 28, 414-428.
  |   Biology  |   Traditional, Fully online  |   182 Undergraduate
Effect of in-class vs online education of sexual health communication skills in first-year medical students: A pilot study.
Palmer, B. A. , Lee, J. H., Somers, K. J., Swintak, C. C. , Rullo, J. , Bright, R. P. , Bostwick, J. M, Frye, M. A. , Sperry, J. A.
ObjectiveOnline education is effective for knowledge acquisition, but its effect on clinical skill development is not well characterized. Weaimed to compare communication skills of 50 first-year medical … [more]
Objective
Online education is effective for knowledge acquisition, but its effect on clinical skill development is not well characterized. Weaimed to compare communication skills of 50 first-year medical students who learned to assess and treat patients through an online learning module vs an in-class lecture.
Methods
Twenty-six students were randomized to learn about antidepressant-induced sexual dysfunction in class and 24 learned the same content through an online module. Students were individually observed conducting an interview with a standardized patient with antidepressant-induced sexual dysfunction. Students were assessed by faculty raters blinded to the student’s learning mode. Standardized patients were asked about their willingness to have the student as their physician.
Results
More students who learned in class vs online demonstrated appropriate verbal empathy (18 [69%] vs 8 [33%]; P = 0.01), defined as completing each task in the “verbal empathy” assessment domain, as measured by a faculty rater. Other assessed variables were not significantly different. Standardized patients’ willingness (vs unwillingness; P = 0.01) to have the student as their physician was associated with the demonstration (by faculty appraisal) of a number of basic skills: using open-ended questions, asking one question at a time, using gender-neutral terminology when asking about the patient’s relationship, and using appropriate sexual-health terminology.
Conclusions
This study, although limited by a single-site design and the small number of participants, offers preliminary evidence that, if confirmed, may suggest that in-class learning from a psychiatrist (vs from an online module) is associated with greater verbal empathy in the assessment of SSRI-related sexual dysfunction 
Full-texts of the citations in the database are protected by copyright. If you would like to read the full articles, please check your academic library. For more information, read the FAQ.
[less]
2019, Academic Psychiatry, 43 (2), 175-179.
  |   Medicine  |   Traditional, Fully online  |   50 Graduate
A comparative analysis of student performance in an online vs. face-to-Face environmental science course From 2009 to 2016.
Paul, J., Jefferson, F.
A growing number of students are now opting for online classes. They find the traditional classroom modality restrictive, inflexible, and impractical. In this age of technological advancement, schools … [more]
A growing number of students are now opting for online classes. They find the traditional classroom modality restrictive, inflexible, and impractical. In this age of technological advancement, schools can now provide effective classroom teaching via the Web. This shift in pedagogical medium is forcing academic institutions to rethink how they want to deliver their course content. The overarching purpose of this research was to determine which teaching method proved more effective over the 8-year period. The scores of 548 students, 401 traditional students and 147 online students, in an environmental science class were used to determine which instructional modality generated better student performance. In addition to the overarching objective, we also examined score variabilities between genders and classifications to determine if teaching modality had a greater impact on specific groups. No significant difference in student performance between online and face-to-face (F2F) learners overall, with respect to gender, or with respect to class rank were found. These data demonstrate the ability to similarly translate environmental science concepts for non-STEM majors in both traditional and online platforms irrespective of gender or class rank. A potential exists for increasing the number of non-STEM majors engaged in citizen science using the flexibility of online learning to teach environmental science core concepts. 
Full-texts of the citations in the database are protected by copyright. If you would like to read the full articles, please check your academic library. For more information, read the FAQ.
[less]
2019, Frontiers in Computer Science , 7, 1- 9.
  |   Computer Science  |   Traditional, Fully online  |   548 Undergraduate
Page: 1 … 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 … 29

About the database

This Ecampus Research Unit project is a searchable resource of academic studies of education efficacy across modalities. Filter by discipline or journal to find research in your subject area of interest. View overview or read the FAQ.

Subscribe to email alerts

* indicates required

Share

Feedback and suggestions

We're always looking for journal article suggestions. Please share your comments and questions.

Email feedback