Online Learning Efficacy Research Database

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Showing 281 - 290 of 294 citations
Comparative analysis of learner satisfaction and learning outcomes in online and face-to-face learning environments.
Johnson, S. D., Aragon, S. R., Shaik, N., Palma-Rivas, N.
This empirical study compared a graduate online course with an equivalent course taught in a traditional face-to-face format on a variety of outcome measures. Comparisons included student ratings … [more]
This empirical study compared a graduate online course with an equivalent course taught in a traditional face-to-face format on a variety of outcome measures. Comparisons included student ratings of instructor and course quality; assessment of course interaction, structure, and support; and learning outcome measures such as course grades and student self-assessment of their ability to perform various Instructional Systems Design (ISD) tasks. Results revealed that the students in the face-to-face course held slightly more positive perceptions about the instructor and overall course quality although there was no difference between the two course formats in several measures of learning outcomes. The findings have direct implications for the creation, development, and delivery of online instruction. 
Full-texts of the citations in the database are protected by copyright. If you would like to read the full articles, please check your academic library. For more information, read the FAQ.
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2000, Journal of Interactive Learning Research, 11(1), 29-49.
  |   Instructional Design  |   Traditional, Fully online  |   38 Graduate
An experimental evaluation of Web-based tutorial quizzes.
Klass, G., Crothers, L.
This study reports the results of a random assignment experiment using Web quizzes constructed with the Mallard software program and a multiple-choice test bank provided with O’Connor … [more]
This study reports the results of a random assignment experiment using Web quizzes constructed with the Mallard software program and a multiple-choice test bank provided with O’Connor and Sabato’s American Government text. The experiment allows comparison of the performance of students who were assigned quizzes on specific chapters of the book with those who were not. The general purpose is to assess whether assigning Web quizzes in a large American government course has any effect on students’ comprehension of the material. The authors found no significant differences on posttest scores between students who were assigned Web quizzes and those who were not. 
Full-texts of the citations in the database are protected by copyright. If you would like to read the full articles, please check your academic library. For more information, read the FAQ.
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2000, Social Science Computer Review, 18(4), 508-515.
  |   American Government  |   Traditional, Web-facilitated  |   115 Undergraduate
Comparison of student outcomes and preferences in a traditional vs. world wide web-based baccalaureate nursing research course.
Leasure, A. R., Davis, L., Thievon, S. L.
The purpose of this project was to compare student outcomes in an undergraduate research course taught using both World Wide Web-based distance learning technology and traditional pedagogy. Reasons … [more]
The purpose of this project was to compare student outcomes in an undergraduate research course taught using both World Wide Web-based distance learning technology and traditional pedagogy. Reasons given for enrolling in the traditional classroom section included the perception of increased opportunity for interaction, decreased opportunity to procrastinate, immediate feedback, and more meaningful learning activities. Reasons for selecting the Web group section included cost, convenience, and flexibility. Overall, there was no significant difference in examination scores between the two groups on the three multiple-choice examinations or for the course grades (t = -.96, P = .343). Students who reported that they were self-directed and had the ability to maintain their own pace and avoid procrastination were most suited to Web-based courses. The Web-based classes can help provide opportunities for methods of communication that are not traditionally nurtured in traditional classroom settings. Secondary benefits of the World Wide Web-based course were to increase student confidence with the computer, and introduce them to skills and opportunities they would not have had in the classroom. Additionally, over time and with practice, student's writing skills improved. 
Full-texts of the citations in the database are protected by copyright. If you would like to read the full articles, please check your academic library. For more information, read the FAQ.
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2000, Journal of Nursing Education, 39(4), 149-154.
  |   Nursing  |   Traditional, Fully online  |   66 Undergraduate
Evaluation of a web-based introductory psychology course: I. Learning and satisfaction in on-line versus lecture courses.
Maki, R. H., Maki, W. S., Patterson, M., Whittaker, P. D.
We offered introductory psychology on the World-Wide Web (WWW) and evaluated the on-line format relative to the traditional lecture-test format, using a pretest-posttest nonequivalent control group design. Multiple … [more]
We offered introductory psychology on the World-Wide Web (WWW) and evaluated the on-line format relative to the traditional lecture-test format, using a pretest-posttest nonequivalent control group design. Multiple sections of the introductory course were offered each semester; on-line and lecture sections were taught by the same instructor, the same textbook was used, and the same in-class examinations were taken. For on-line sections, mastery quizzes, interactive individual exercises, and weekly laboratory meetings replaced lectures. Increased content knowledge was greater for the students in the Web sections, as was in-class examination performance. Use of the WWW and computers for academic purposes increased more in the on-line sections, and the on-line students showed a greater decrease in computer anxiety. The students in the on-line sections expressed appreciation for course components and the convenience of the course, but the lecture sections received higher ratings on course evaluations than did the on-line sections. Learning and course satisfaction were dissociated in the two course formats. 
Full-texts of the citations in the database are protected by copyright. If you would like to read the full articles, please check your academic library. For more information, read the FAQ.
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2000, Behavior Research Methods, Instruments, & Computers, Instruments, & Computers, 32(2), 230-239.
  |   Psychology  |   Traditional, Fully online  |   218 Undergraduate
Student assessment comparison of lecture and online construction equipment and methods classes.
Ryan, R. C.
2000, THE Journal (Technological Horizons In Education), 27(6), 78.
Construction Science  |   Traditional, Fully online  |   26 Unknown
Achievement predictors for a computer-applications module delivered online.
Wallace, P. E., Clariana, R. B.
The program evaluation compared student achievement and self-report data in two types of learning environments—atraditional classroom environment and an online learning environment to examine the comparative … [more]
The program evaluation compared student achievement and self-report data in two types of learning environments—a
traditional classroom environment and an online learning environment to examine the comparative effectiveness of online delivery, to identify characteristics of successful and unsuccessful distance learning students, and to gauge degree of satisfaction with online delivery. Undergraduate students (N=93) enrolled in four sections of Business 100, Computer Fundamentals, were assigned by section to complete a 4-weeks long spreadsheet module either in class (control) or online (experimental). The online instruction was delivered via a website and was supplemented with email and listserv discussion. Posttest findings revealed no significant differences in knowledge gain between the control (M = .75) and online (M = .77) groups, indicating that this online module was at least as effective as the traditional classroom instruction. Post hoc analysis of achievement data showed that more capable students working online scored significantly better (p<.01) than the more capable control group. Self-report measures compared to achievement indicated that frequent computer users benefited most from online delivery, while frequent computer use was not a factor in the control group's performance. Also competitiveness had a negative correlation with achievement for the online group but not for the control group. In summary, this online instruction provided an effective standardized course delivery. However low-prior knowledge students who are less frequent computer users were not served well by this online instruction. 
Full-texts of the citations in the database are protected by copyright. If you would like to read the full articles, please check your academic library. For more information, read the FAQ.
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2000, Journal of Information Systems Education, 11(1/2), 13–18.
  |   Business  |   Traditional, Fully online  |   93 Undergraduate
The power of cyberlearning: An empirical test.
Navarro, P., Shoemaker, J.
The controversy over cyberlearning, as an integral part of the teaching and learning process in higher education, is growing almost as fast as the technology itself. Unfortunately, there … [more]
The controversy over cyberlearning, as an integral part of the teaching and learning process in higher education, is growing almost as fast as the technology itself. Unfortunately, there are relatively few empirical studies that provide a comprehensive test of the effectiveness of cyberlearning. This exploratory study compares Cyberlearners with Traditional Learners in a graduate-level MBA course in introductory macroeconomics. The findings appear to provide evidence that cyberlearning can be as effective as traditional classroom learning. 
Full-texts of the citations in the database are protected by copyright. If you would like to read the full articles, please check your academic library. For more information, read the FAQ.
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1999, Journal of Computing in Higher Education, 11(1), 29-54.
  |   Economics  |   Traditional, Fully online  |   63 Graduate
Asynchronous computer-mediated communication versus face-to-face collaboration: Results on student learning, quality and satisfaction.
Ocker, R. J., Yaverbaum, G. J.
Although there has been more than a decade of literature on computer-mediated communication in education, the research has been unclear as to whether it is an effective replacement … [more]
Although there has been more than a decade of literature on computer-mediated communication in education, the research has been unclear as to whether it is an effective replacement for face-to-face (FtF) collaboration. This study sought to add to this body of research by exploring the effects of two modes of collaboration on student groups. Following a repeated-measures experimental design, each student group collaborated on two case studies, one using face-to-face collaboration and the other using asynchronous computer conferencing technology as a means of collaboration. Empirical findings indicate that asynchronous collaboration is as effective as face-to-face collaboration in terms of learning, quality of solution, solution content, and satisfaction with the solution quality. However, students were significantly less satisfied with the asynchronous learning experience, both in terms of the group interaction process and the quality of group discussions. 
Full-texts of the citations in the database are protected by copyright. If you would like to read the full articles, please check your academic library. For more information, read the FAQ.
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1999, Group Decision and Negotiation, 8(5), 427-440.
  |   Business  |   Traditional, Web-facilitated  |   43 Graduate
Learning in an online format versus an in-class format: An experimental study.
Sims, R. L., Schuman, A. H.
1999, THE Journal (Technological Horizons in Education), 26(11), 54.
Multiple  |   Traditional, Fully online  |   99 Undergraduate
An analysis of the use of virtual delivery of undergraduate lectures.
Smeaton, A. F., Keogh, G.
Educators and technologists have been wrestling with the most appropriate way in which to use information technology in teaching and in learning, for some years. We have seen … [more]
Educators and technologists have been wrestling with the most appropriate way in which to use information technology in teaching and in learning, for some years. We have seen online course notes, both linear, hypertext and hypermedia format, lecturer/student communication via electronic bulletin boards or via e-mail, multimedia courseware with student-directed learning and many others. All of these approaches have had limited impact on mainstream teaching in our universities and colleges and we believe one of the reasons for this is that these attempts all represent a significant shift in the normal student–lecturer relationship and an enormous amount of effort on the part of the lecturer. In our work we have addressed this by using technology to replicate the traditional mode of delivery of lectures to a class. The presentation of lecture material was digitally recorded, both audio and synchronised visuals, and made available for students to take in their own time. In addition we provided 3 orthogonal means to access this material. The present paper describes our analysis of the use of these `virtual lectures' by a class of over 100 students. Our analysis includes log files of all accesses to the online material, pre-course and post-course questionnaires and anonymous questionnaire feedback, some of this is compared to exam performance. Results indicate that mode of delivery, student usage and a student's technical bias have no impact on overall exam performance. 
Full-texts of the citations in the database are protected by copyright. If you would like to read the full articles, please check your academic library. For more information, read the FAQ.
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1999, Computers & Education, 32(1), 83-94.
  |   Computer Science  |   Traditional, Fully online  |   115 Undergraduate
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This Ecampus Research Unit project is a searchable resource of academic studies of education efficacy across modalities. Filter by discipline or journal to find research in your subject area of interest. View overview or read the FAQ.

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