Online Learning Efficacy Research Database

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Showing 281 - 289 of 289 citations
Achievement predictors for a computer-applications module delivered online.
Wallace, P. E., Clariana, R. B.
The program evaluation compared student achievement and self-report data in two types of learning environments—atraditional classroom environment and an online learning environment to examine the comparative … [more]
The program evaluation compared student achievement and self-report data in two types of learning environments—a
traditional classroom environment and an online learning environment to examine the comparative effectiveness of online delivery, to identify characteristics of successful and unsuccessful distance learning students, and to gauge degree of satisfaction with online delivery. Undergraduate students (N=93) enrolled in four sections of Business 100, Computer Fundamentals, were assigned by section to complete a 4-weeks long spreadsheet module either in class (control) or online (experimental). The online instruction was delivered via a website and was supplemented with email and listserv discussion. Posttest findings revealed no significant differences in knowledge gain between the control (M = .75) and online (M = .77) groups, indicating that this online module was at least as effective as the traditional classroom instruction. Post hoc analysis of achievement data showed that more capable students working online scored significantly better (p<.01) than the more capable control group. Self-report measures compared to achievement indicated that frequent computer users benefited most from online delivery, while frequent computer use was not a factor in the control group's performance. Also competitiveness had a negative correlation with achievement for the online group but not for the control group. In summary, this online instruction provided an effective standardized course delivery. However low-prior knowledge students who are less frequent computer users were not served well by this online instruction. 
Full-texts of the citations in the database are protected by copyright. If you would like to read the full articles, please check your academic library. For more information, read the FAQ.
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2000, Journal of Information Systems Education, 11(1/2), 13–18.
  |   Business  |   Traditional, Fully online  |   93 Undergraduate
The power of cyberlearning: An empirical test.
Navarro, P., Shoemaker, J.
The controversy over cyberlearning, as an integral part of the teaching and learning process in higher education, is growing almost as fast as the technology itself. Unfortunately, there … [more]
The controversy over cyberlearning, as an integral part of the teaching and learning process in higher education, is growing almost as fast as the technology itself. Unfortunately, there are relatively few empirical studies that provide a comprehensive test of the effectiveness of cyberlearning. This exploratory study compares Cyberlearners with Traditional Learners in a graduate-level MBA course in introductory macroeconomics. The findings appear to provide evidence that cyberlearning can be as effective as traditional classroom learning. 
Full-texts of the citations in the database are protected by copyright. If you would like to read the full articles, please check your academic library. For more information, read the FAQ.
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1999, Journal of Computing in Higher Education, 11(1), 29-54.
  |   Economics  |   Traditional, Fully online  |   63 Graduate
Asynchronous computer-mediated communication versus face-to-face collaboration: Results on student learning, quality and satisfaction.
Ocker, R. J., Yaverbaum, G. J.
Although there has been more than a decade of literature on computer-mediated communication in education, the research has been unclear as to whether it is an effective replacement … [more]
Although there has been more than a decade of literature on computer-mediated communication in education, the research has been unclear as to whether it is an effective replacement for face-to-face (FtF) collaboration. This study sought to add to this body of research by exploring the effects of two modes of collaboration on student groups. Following a repeated-measures experimental design, each student group collaborated on two case studies, one using face-to-face collaboration and the other using asynchronous computer conferencing technology as a means of collaboration. Empirical findings indicate that asynchronous collaboration is as effective as face-to-face collaboration in terms of learning, quality of solution, solution content, and satisfaction with the solution quality. However, students were significantly less satisfied with the asynchronous learning experience, both in terms of the group interaction process and the quality of group discussions. 
Full-texts of the citations in the database are protected by copyright. If you would like to read the full articles, please check your academic library. For more information, read the FAQ.
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1999, Group Decision and Negotiation, 8(5), 427-440.
  |   Business  |   Traditional, Web-facilitated  |   43 Graduate
Learning in an online format versus an in-class format: An experimental study.
Sims, R. L., Schuman, A. H.
1999, THE Journal (Technological Horizons in Education), 26(11), 54.
Multiple  |   Traditional, Fully online  |   99 Undergraduate
An analysis of the use of virtual delivery of undergraduate lectures.
Smeaton, A. F., Keogh, G.
Educators and technologists have been wrestling with the most appropriate way in which to use information technology in teaching and in learning, for some years. We have seen … [more]
Educators and technologists have been wrestling with the most appropriate way in which to use information technology in teaching and in learning, for some years. We have seen online course notes, both linear, hypertext and hypermedia format, lecturer/student communication via electronic bulletin boards or via e-mail, multimedia courseware with student-directed learning and many others. All of these approaches have had limited impact on mainstream teaching in our universities and colleges and we believe one of the reasons for this is that these attempts all represent a significant shift in the normal student–lecturer relationship and an enormous amount of effort on the part of the lecturer. In our work we have addressed this by using technology to replicate the traditional mode of delivery of lectures to a class. The presentation of lecture material was digitally recorded, both audio and synchronised visuals, and made available for students to take in their own time. In addition we provided 3 orthogonal means to access this material. The present paper describes our analysis of the use of these `virtual lectures' by a class of over 100 students. Our analysis includes log files of all accesses to the online material, pre-course and post-course questionnaires and anonymous questionnaire feedback, some of this is compared to exam performance. Results indicate that mode of delivery, student usage and a student's technical bias have no impact on overall exam performance. 
Full-texts of the citations in the database are protected by copyright. If you would like to read the full articles, please check your academic library. For more information, read the FAQ.
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1999, Computers & Education, 32(1), 83-94.
  |   Computer Science  |   Traditional, Fully online  |   115 Undergraduate
The effects of Internet-based instruction on student learning.
Wegner, S. B., Holloway, K. C., Garton, E. M.
The practice of using technology to deliver coursework in higher education has seen a veritable explosion. The use of technology has not only created new opportunities within the … [more]
The practice of using technology to deliver coursework in higher education has seen a veritable explosion. The use of technology has not only created new opportunities within the traditional classroom but has also served to expand learning experiences beyond the popular notion of “classroom". Indeed, “distance learning" especially utilization of the Internet, is becoming a widely used delivery alternative at universities nationwide. In many instances the change to an Internet-based delivery system has been instituted with little or no consideration of the impact on student learning. This paper presents data from a two semester study of the effects of distance learning on student achievement as well as the impact of distance learning on student attitudes concerning their learning experiences. Students ’ test scores and satisfaction survey results from an Internet-based test group were compared to a control group whose instructional opportunities were from traditional, in-class models. Researchers found no significant difference between the test scores of the two groups. Additionally, while statistically significant data could not be produced in the area of student perceptions, general observations supported that, overall, students in the experimental group had a more positive feeling about their experience than the control group. 
Full-texts of the citations in the database are protected by copyright. If you would like to read the full articles, please check your academic library. For more information, read the FAQ.
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1999, Journal of Asynchronous Learning Networks, 3(2), 98-106.
  |   Education  |   Traditional, Fully online  |   31 Graduate
The effects of world wide web instruction and traditional instruction and learning styles on achievement and changes in student attitudes in a technical writing in agricommunication course.
Day, T. M., Raven, M. R., Newman, M. E.
The purpose of this experimental study was to determine the effects of types of instruction and learning styles in a three-credit hour, technical writing in an agricommunication course … [more]
The purpose of this experimental study was to determine the effects of types of instruction and learning styles in a three-credit hour, technical writing in an agricommunication course on their achievement and attitudes towards writing, learning about writing, computers and the Internet. The two methods of instruction were traditional instruction without a laboratory and World Wide Web instruction with a laboratory. Two applications questions on the midterm examination and the major class project were used to measure students’ achievement. To measure the attitudes of the students, a semantic differential instrument was developed. The Group Embedded Figures Test (GEFT) was used to determine preferred learning styles. Significant differences were found to exist between type of instruction for both achievement and attitudes. WWW-dependent instruction was significantly higher for group means on achievement. The WWW-dependent class also had a higher mean gain for attitude toward writing. No significant difference was found between learning style groups on achievement and attitudes. There was no significant interaction effect between type of instruction and learning style on achievement or attitudes. 
Full-texts of the citations in the database are protected by copyright. If you would like to read the full articles, please check your academic library. For more information, read the FAQ.
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1998, Journal of Agricultural Education, 39(4), 65-75.
  |   Education  |   Traditional, Fully online  |   58 Undergraduate
Learning in cyberspace: Shaping the future.
Gilliver, R. S., Randall, B., Pok, Y. M.
Proponents of multimedia and Internet based educational tools have long claimed their potential, but the absence of broad based quantitative research from controlled experimental use, continues to mitigate … [more]
Proponents of multimedia and Internet based educational tools have long claimed their potential, but the absence of broad based quantitative research from controlled experimental use, continues to mitigate the transfer of that potential to reality. This paper reports on experimental work in Singapore, which was designed to establish a supportable theoretical foundation for the hypothesis that the use of information technology (IT) resources in education, does improve pedagogic outcomes. The authors reach a positive conclusion, and attribute those improved outcomes to the use of IT resources through the conduit of improved student motivation. The paper also draws the important distinction between using multimedia and the Internet as a facilitator of learning rather than teaching, and reports upon the research project in detail, particularly improvements in student understanding and results, quantified at 11% in one semester. There were also productivity gains of 16% for educators as a result of effective use of Internet resources and use of the Internet to deliver course material for learning. Based on the research work done, this paper draws the statistically valid conclusion that use of IT resources does improve student learning. 
Full-texts of the citations in the database are protected by copyright. If you would like to read the full articles, please check your academic library. For more information, read the FAQ.
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1998, Journal of Computer Assisted Learning, 14(3), 212-222.
  |   Accounting  |   Traditional, Web-facilitated  |   444 Undergraduate
Audiographic telecourses for the Web: An experiment.
LaRose, R., Gregg, J., Eastin, M.
Prior research on instructional media effects suggested that an audiographic approach to World Wide Web based courses would optimize educational effectiveness along with cost effectiveness, although with a … [more]
Prior research on instructional media effects suggested that an audiographic approach to World Wide Web based courses would optimize educational effectiveness along with cost effectiveness, although with a possible loss of teacher immediacy that could adversely affect student attitudes. An introductory telecommunication course was converted to an audiographic Web telecourse in which students listened to pre-recorded audio classroom interactions while viewing a detailed course outline and illustrative sites over the World Wide Web. Forty-nine subjects were recruited from a live lecture class and randomly assigned to either the experimental (Web course) group or a control group that took the class in a traditional lecture section. Analysis of covariance (ANCOVA) showed that the experimental group had test scores and student attitude and teacher immediacy ratings equal to those of the control group after controlling for student gender, class level, grade point average and attendance. Open-ended interviews were also conducted to assess qualitative dimensions of student satisfaction. The results supported the audiographic telecourse model as a potentially cost-effective approach to distributing courses over the Web. New directions in research on instructional media effects and teacher immediacy were formulated from an analysis of the unique characteristics of the World Wide Web as an instructional medium. 
Full-texts of the citations in the database are protected by copyright. If you would like to read the full articles, please check your academic library. For more information, read the FAQ.
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1998, Journal of Computer-Mediated Communication, 4(2).
  |   Communications  |   Traditional, Fully online  |   49 Undergraduate
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This Ecampus Research Unit project is a searchable resource of academic studies of education efficacy across modalities. Filter by discipline or journal to find research in your subject area of interest. View overview or read the FAQ.

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