Learning in Portland

Hybrid learning FAQ

What to expect at the OSU Portland Center

Here are some frequently asked questions and answers that will help you gain a better understanding of the hybrid learning experience as a student at the OSU Portland Center at Pioneer Square.

What is a hybrid course?

A hybrid course blends regularly scheduled, face-to-face classroom meetings with significant online coursework and interaction. For students at the OSU Portland Center at Pioneer Square, the in-person classroom sessions emphasize engaged, active learning while the online components offer guided learning activities and interaction that add flexibility to fit your personal schedule.

What should I expect in a hybrid course?

A portion of your instruction and assignments will be presented in a traditional classroom, and the remainder will be delivered online. In general, undergraduate hybrid courses at the OSU Portland Center will feature half of the coursework delivered online and half delivered in a weekly class meeting.

Your instructor will provide details regarding what coursework will be required in class and what work will be required when online.

What are the benefits for students to take a hybrid course?

Hybrid courses are designed to give you the opportunity to engage with course material both individually and in group settings. It’s a “best of both worlds” approach that pairs the flexibility of online study with the face-to-face learning experiences many students crave.

Oregon State is a nationally ranked leader in online and hybrid education, meaning you can rest assured that the quality and effort that goes into designing and teaching hybrid courses is of the highest caliber.

You’ll not only have access to a variety of online resources through OSU Ecampus – such as student success coaching and access to OSU Libraries – but you’ll also benefit from a host of on-site support services at the OSU Portland Center. Those services include:

  • Academic advising
  • Tutoring
  • One-on-one meetings with faculty
  • Group work
  • Networking
  • Workshops

Are hybrid courses designed for specific students?

Hybrid courses are designed for students who:

  • are interested in active and participatory learning, both in a traditional classroom and online.
  • have work and/or family obligations and need the flexibility of online learning to reduce their commute to site-based class sessions.
  • wish to have the benefits of regular face-to-face contact with the instructor and other students, instead of undertaking a solely distance education experience.

Who can take a hybrid class at Oregon State?

Anyone who has been admitted to OSU and meets the individual prerequisites for a particular class can enroll in a hybrid course.

Will I be working on my own?

The hybrid learning experience enables you to learn alongside faculty and classmates, both in person and online, while also working independently. In the face-to-face classroom setting, you’ll work closely with the instructor and the students.

The online learning activities tend to provide a bit more of an independent environment, but Oregon State’s online learners often say they experience just as much interaction among classmates and instructors as they did in previous on-campus classes. These online interactions usually take place in class discussion boards and occasionally through the use of video conferencing software (e.g. Skype, Google Hangouts, Webex) for group work collaborations.

Will hybrid course credits apply towards my degree/certificate just like a traditional on-campus course or a fully online course?

Yes, Oregon State’s hybrid courses meet identical learning outcomes as OSU courses that are delivered 100 percent in person and those delivered fully online. Your transcripts will not reflect any differences for taking hybrid courses.

What are the technical requirements to take a hybrid course?

You will need regular access to a computer, the internet and your Oregon State email account in order to successfully participate in both the online and face-to-face components of hybrid courses.

If you’d like to know what hardware and software we recommend, use our quick-and-easy computer check to see if the device you are currently using meets the minimum requirements needed for OSU’s online hybrid courses.


Hybrid course example

Every hybrid course is unique in how it is structured and delivered, but below is an example from Oregon State's human development and family sciences program:

HDFS 201 – Contemporary Families in the U.S.

This 3-credit, 10-week hybrid course combines approximately 90 hours of online and in-person instruction, learning activities and assignments. Half of the in-person class time is replaced with online activities. You can anticipate spending at least two hours each week engaged in this course for each credit.

As this is a 3-credit course, you’ll spend approximately six hours each week engaged with this course, including the 90 minutes of in-person class time. Both the online and in-person components are required.

IN-PERSON COMPONENT

The in-person component of the course meets every Wednesday from 2 to 3:30 p.m. for 10 weeks. The face-to-face sessions are for:

  • “Housekeeping” – Checking in about how things are going, questions about assignments, non-content related issues
  • “Notions and naggings” – Informal opportunities for reflection and writing
  • “Review, apply and expand” – Group discussions about the reading assignments and online learning activities; field-trips; individual application of one’s learning
  • “Brainstorming and workshopping” – Working together to review, synthesize and apply learning in this course for the final project as well as for one’s ongoing education, work, and personal life

ONLINE COMPONENT

The online component is delivered via Canvas, where you'll interact with your classmates and your instructor. You'll access the learning materials within the course site, such as the syllabus, class discussions, assignments, projects and quizzes. The online component is for:

  • Weekly required discussions connected to the weekly required readings and other learning activities; the online discussions will inform the in-person “notions and naggings” and “review, apply and expand” discussions
  • “Chitting and chatting” – Ongoing discussion about issues, resources and opportunities of general interest
  • Nested glossary and annotated bibliography submissions – You'll also bring your findings from these learning projects into our in-person sessions during the “review, apply and expand” discussions
  • Mid-point and end-point self-assessment and course feedback
  • Submitting and receiving feedback on assignments
  • Supplemental readings and digital resources
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